D68.0 - Von Willebrand disease

Version 2023
Replaced Code
ICD-10:D68.0
Short Description:Von Willebrand disease
Long Description:Von Willebrand disease
Status: Not Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Coagulation defects, purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D65-D69)
      • Other coagulation defects (D68)

D68.0 is a non-specific and non-billable ICD-10 code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of von willebrand disease. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Von Willebrand disease

Non-specific codes like D68.0 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for von willebrand disease:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.00 for Von Willebrand disease, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.01 for Von Willebrand disease, type 1
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - D68.02 for Von Willebrand disease, type 2
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.020 for Von Willebrand disease, type 2A
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.021 for Von Willebrand disease, type 2B
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.022 for Von Willebrand disease, type 2M
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.023 for Von Willebrand disease, type 2N
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.029 for Von Willebrand disease, type 2, unspecified
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.03 for Von Willebrand disease, type 3
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.04 for Acquired von Willebrand disease
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D68.09 for Other von Willebrand disease

New 2023 ICD-10 Code

D68.0 is new to ICD-10 code set for the FY 2023, effective October 1, 2022. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2022. This is a new and revised code for the FY 2023 (October 1, 2022 - September 30, 2023).

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2023 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2022. This code was replaced for the FY 2023 (October 1, 2022 - September 30, 2023).


  • D68.00 - Von Willebrand disease, unspecified
  • D68.01 - Von Willebrand disease, type 1
  • D68.020 - Von Willebrand disease, type 2A
  • D68.021 - Von Willebrand disease, type 2B
  • D68.022 - Von Willebrand disease, type 2M
  • D68.023 - Von Willebrand disease, type 2N
  • D68.029 - Von Willebrand disease, type 2, unspecified
  • D68.03 - Von Willebrand disease, type 3
  • D68.04 - Acquired von Willebrand disease
  • D68.09 - Other von Willebrand disease

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to this diagnosis code:


Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
D68.0286.4 - Von willebrand's disease

Patient Education


Platelet Disorders

Platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are blood cells. They form in your bone marrow, a sponge-like tissue in your bones. Platelets play a major role in blood clotting. Normally, when one of your blood vessels is injured, you start to bleed. Your platelets will clot (clump together) to plug the hole in the blood vessel and stop the bleeding. You can have different problems with your platelets:

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Von Willebrand disease

Von Willebrand disease is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood clotting process, causing prolonged bleeding after an injury. People with this condition often experience easy bruising, long-lasting nosebleeds, and excessive bleeding or oozing following an injury, surgery, or dental work. Mild forms of von Willebrand disease may become apparent only when abnormal bleeding occurs following surgery or a serious injury. Women with this condition typically have heavy or prolonged bleeding during menstruation (menorrhagia), and some may also experience reproductive tract bleeding during pregnancy and childbirth. In severe cases of von Willebrand disease, heavy bleeding occurs after minor trauma or even in the absence of injury (spontaneous bleeding). Symptoms of von Willebrand disease may change over time. Increased age, pregnancy, exercise, and stress may cause bleeding symptoms to become less frequent.

Von Willebrand disease is divided into three types, with type 2 being further divided into four subtypes. Type 1 is the mildest and most common of the three types, accounting for 75 percent of affected individuals. Type 3 is the most severe and rarest form of the condition. The four subtypes of type 2 von Willebrand disease are intermediate in severity. Another form of the disorder, acquired von Willebrand syndrome, is not caused by inherited gene mutations. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome is typically seen along with other disorders, such as diseases that affect bone marrow or immune cell function. This rare form of the condition is characterized by abnormal bleeding into the skin and other soft tissues, usually beginning in adulthood.


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Code History