2022 ICD-10-CM Code E75.4

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:E75.4
Short Description:Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis
Long Description:Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Disord of sphingolipid metab and oth lipid storage disorders (E75)

E75.4 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. The code E75.4 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code E75.4 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acquired ataxia, adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, atpase cation transporting 13a2 related juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, cerebral degeneration in childhood, cerebral lipidosis , congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, etc.

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E75.4:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E75.4 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert E75.4 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code E75.4 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Genetic Brain Disorders

A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form of a gene. A mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the brain.

Some genetic brain disorders are due to random gene mutations or mutations caused by environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoke. Other disorders are inherited, which means that a mutated gene or group of genes is passed down through a family. They can also be due to a combination of both genetic changes and other outside factors.

Some examples of genetic brain disorders include

Many people with genetic brain disorders fail to produce enough of certain proteins that influence brain development and function. These brain disorders can cause serious problems that affect the nervous system. Some have treatments to control symptoms. Some are life-threatening.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN1 disease

CLN1 disease is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. Individuals with this condition have normal development in infancy, but typically by 18 months they become increasingly irritable and begin to lose previously acquired skills (developmental regression). In affected children, nerve cells in the brain die over time, leading to an overall loss of brain tissue (brain atrophy) and an unusually small head (microcephaly). Children with CLN1 disease have decreased muscle tone (hypotonia), intellectual and motor disability, and rarely are able to speak or walk. Some affected children develop repetitive hand movements. By age 2, individuals with this condition often have muscle twitches (myoclonus), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), and vision loss. Some affected children develop frequent respiratory infections. As the condition worsens, children have severe feeding difficulties that often require a feeding tube. Children with CLN1 disease usually do not survive past childhood.

Some people with CLN1 disease do not develop symptoms until later in childhood or in adulthood. As with younger affected children, older individuals develop a decline in intellectual function, myoclonus, epilepsy, and vision loss. In these individuals, life expectancy depends on when signs and symptoms of CLN1 disease develop and their severity; affected individuals may survive only into adolescence or through adulthood. Adults with CLN1 disease may also have movement disorders, including impaired muscle coordination (ataxia) or a pattern of movement abnormalities known as parkinsonism.

CLN1 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. All these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN10 disease

CLN10 disease is a severe disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. Individuals with this condition typically show signs and symptoms soon after birth. These signs and symptoms can include muscle rigidity, respiratory failure, and prolonged episodes of seizure activity that last several minutes (status epilepticus). It is likely that some affected individuals also have seizures before birth while in the womb. Infants with CLN10 disease have unusually small heads (microcephaly) with brains that may be less than half the normal size. There is a loss of brain cells in areas that coordinate movement (the cerebellum) and control thinking and emotions (the cerebral cortex). Nerve cells in the brain also lack a fatty substance called myelin, which protects them and promotes efficient transmission of nerve impulses. Infants with CLN10 disease often die hours to weeks after birth.

In some individuals with CLN10 disease, the condition does not appear until later in life, between late infancy and adulthood. These individuals have a gradual loss of brain cells and often develop problems with balance and coordination (ataxia), loss of speech, a progressive loss in intellectual functioning (cognitive decline), and vision loss. Individuals with later-onset CLN10 disease have a shortened lifespan, depending on when their signs and symptoms first started.

CLN10 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). All of these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause progressive problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN11 disease

CLN11 disease is a disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. Individuals with this condition typically show signs and symptoms in adolescence or early adulthood. This condition is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy), vision loss, problems with balance and coordination (cerebellar ataxia), and a decline in intellectual function.

Seizures in CLN11 disease often involve a loss of consciousness, muscle stiffness (rigidity), and generalized convulsions (tonic-clonic seizures).

Vision loss is gradual over time and is due to a condition called retinitis pigmentosa, which is caused by the breakdown of the light-sensitive layer at the back of the eye (retina). People with CLN11 disease can also develop clouding of the lenses of the eyes (cataracts) and rapid, involuntary eye movements (nystagmus).

Affected individuals can also develop muscle twitches (myoclonus), walking problems and falling (gait disturbance), and impaired speech (dysarthria). Over time, people with CLN11 disease develop short-term memory loss and loss of executive function, which is the ability to plan and implement problem-solving strategies and actions. They may also become irritable and impulsive. Some affected individuals experience visual hallucinations involving people or animals.

CLN11 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). All of these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause progressive problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN2 disease

CLN2 disease is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. The signs and symptoms of this condition typically begin between ages 2 and 4. The initial features usually include recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia). Affected children also develop muscle twitches (myoclonus) and vision loss. CLN2 disease affects motor skills, such as sitting and walking, and speech development. This condition also causes the loss of previously acquired skills (developmental regression), intellectual disability that gradually gets worse, and behavioral problems. Individuals with this condition often require the use of a wheelchair by late childhood and typically do not survive past their teens.

Some children with CLN2 disease do not develop symptoms until later in childhood, typically after age 4. These individuals tend to have milder features overall compared to those diagnosed earlier, but with more severe ataxia. They have a shortened life expectancy, although they tend to survive into adulthood.

CLN2 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. All these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN3 disease

CLN3 disease is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. After 4 to 6 years of normal development, children with this condition develop vision impairment, intellectual disability, movement problems, speech difficulties, and seizures, which worsen over time.

In children with CLN3 disease, problems with vision often begin between the ages of 4 and 8 years. Vision impairment is caused by a breakdown of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retinal degeneration), which worsens with age. People with CLN3 disease are often blind by late childhood or adolescence. Also around age 4 to 8, children with CLN3 disease start to fall behind in school. They have difficulty learning new information and lose previously acquired skills (developmental regression), usually beginning with loss of the ability to speak in complete sentences.

Seizures and movement abnormalities often develop in adolescence in people with CLN3 disease. These abnormalities include muscle rigidity or stiffness, clumsiness, slow or diminished movements (hypokinesia), and a stooped posture. Over time, affected individuals lose the ability to walk or sit independently and require wheelchair assistance. Rarely, people with CLN3 disease develop a distorted view of reality (psychosis) or false perceptions (hallucinations). Some affected individuals have an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) later in life. Most people with CLN3 disease live into early adulthood.

CLN3 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. All these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN4 disease

CLN4 disease is a condition that primarily affects the nervous system, causing problems with movement and intellectual function that worsen over time. The signs and symptoms of CLN4 disease typically appear around age 30, but they can develop anytime between adolescence and late adulthood.

People with CLN4 disease often develop seizures and uncontrollable muscle jerks (myoclonic epilepsy), a decline in intellectual function (dementia), problems with coordination and balance (ataxia), tremors or other involuntary movements (motor tics), and speech difficulties (dysarthria). The signs and symptoms of CLN4 disease worsen over time, and affected individuals usually survive about 15 years after the disorder begins.

CLN4 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. (The adult forms of NCLs, which includes CLN4 disease, are sometimes known as Kufs disease.) All the NCLs affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN5 disease

CLN5 disease is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. The signs and symptoms of this condition can begin anytime between childhood and early adulthood, but they typically appear around age 5. Children with CLN5 disease often have normal development until they experience the first signs of the condition, which are usually problems with movement that might seem like clumsiness, and a loss of previously acquired motor skills (developmental regression). Other features of the condition include recurrent seizures that involve uncontrollable muscle jerks (myoclonic epilepsy), difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), vision loss, speech problems, and a decline in intellectual function. The life expectancy of people with CLN5 disease varies; affected individuals usually survive into adolescence or mid-adulthood.

CLN5 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. All these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN6 disease

CLN6 disease is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. The signs and symptoms of this condition typically begin between early and late childhood, but sometimes they can appear in adulthood.

Most children with CLN6 disease initially experience the loss of previously acquired skills (developmental regression). Affected individuals can also develop recurrent seizures (epilepsy), difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), muscle twitches (myoclonus), impaired speech (dysarthria), and vision loss. The movement problems worsen over time until affected children cannot walk, stand, or sit without assistance. Intellectual function also declines over time. Most children with CLN6 disease do not survive into adulthood.

Some people with CLN6 disease do not show signs or symptoms of the condition until adulthood, typically after age 30. These individuals can have epilepsy, ataxia, dysarthria, and a progressive loss of intellectual function. CLN6 disease usually does not cause vision loss in affected adults. Adults with this condition do not often survive more than 10 years after diagnosis.

CLN6 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. All these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN7 disease

CLN7 disease is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. The signs and symptoms of this condition typically begin between ages 2 and 7. The initial features are usually vision loss and problems with movement that might seem like clumsiness. Additional signs and symptoms of CLN7 disease include muscle twitches (myoclonus), difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), and speech impairment. Mental functioning and motor skills (such as sitting and walking) decline with age. Individuals with CLN7 disease typically do not survive past their teens.

CLN7 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. All these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

CLN8 disease

CLN8 disease is an inherited disorder that varies in severity and primarily affects the nervous system. The condition is generally separated into less-severe and more-severe forms, based on the types of signs and symptoms that develop and life expectancy.

The less-severe form of CLN8 disease, sometimes referred to as Northern epilepsy, is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and a decline in intellectual function that begins between ages 5 and 10. The seizures in this form may be resistant to treatment and are often the generalized tonic-clonic type, which involve muscle rigidity, convulsions, and loss of consciousness. Some people with this form of CLN8 disease also experience partial seizures, which do not cause a loss of consciousness. The seizures occur approximately one to two times per month until adolescence; by early adulthood the frequency decreases to about four to six times per year. By middle age, seizures become even less frequent. In addition to seizures, affected individuals experience a gradual decline in intellectual function and develop problems with coordination and balance. Vision problems may occur in early to mid-adulthood. Individuals with the less-severe form of CLN8 disease often live into late adulthood.

The more-severe form of CLN8 disease typically begins between ages 2 and 7.The seizures in this form involve uncontrollable muscle jerks (myoclonic epilepsy). Individuals with the more-severe form have a more pronounced decline in intellectual function and usually lose the ability to speak. Vision loss is also common. People with this form of CLN8 disease have increasing difficulty walking and coordinating movements (ataxia), eventually becoming immobile. Individuals with the more-severe form of CLN8 disease usually survive only into late childhood or adolescence.

CLN8 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), which may also be collectively referred to as Batten disease. All these disorders affect the nervous system and typically cause worsening problems with vision, movement, and thinking ability. The different NCLs are distinguished by their genetic cause. Each disease type is given the designation "CLN," meaning ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal, and then a number to indicate its subtype.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)