ICD-10-CM Code E76.1

Mucopolysaccharidosis, type II

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

E76.1 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis, type ii. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code E76.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like cerebral degeneration in hunter's disease or cerebral degeneration in mucopolysaccharidosis or hunter's syndrome, mild form or hunter's syndrome, severe form or mucopolysaccharidosis, mps-ii.

ICD-10:E76.1
Short Description:Mucopolysaccharidosis, type II
Long Description:Mucopolysaccharidosis, type II

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E76.1:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Hunter's syndrome

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E76.1 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Cerebral degeneration in Hunter's disease
  • Cerebral degeneration in mucopolysaccharidosis
  • Hunter's syndrome, mild form
  • Hunter's syndrome, severe form
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-II

Clinical Information

  • MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS III-. mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by heparitin sulfate in the urine progressive mental retardation mild dwarfism and other skeletal disorders. there are four clinically indistinguishable but biochemically distinct forms each due to a deficiency of a different enzyme.
  • MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS II-. systemic lysosomal storage disease marked by progressive physical deterioration and caused by a deficiency of l sulfoiduronate sulfatase. this disease differs from mucopolysaccharidosis i by slower progression lack of corneal clouding and x linked rather than autosomal recessive inheritance. the mild form produces near normal intelligence and life span. the severe form usually causes death by age 15.

Convert E76.1 to ICD-9

  • 277.5 - Mucopolysaccharidosis (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Disorders of glycosaminoglycan metabolism (E76)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process.

Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally your enzymes break carbohydrates down into glucose (a type of sugar). If you have one of these disorders, you may not have enough enzymes to break down the carbohydrates. Or the enzymes may not work properly. This causes a harmful amount of sugar to build up in your body. That can lead to health problems, some of which can be serious. Some of the disorders are fatal.

These disorders are inherited. Newborn babies get screened for many of them, using blood tests. If there is a family history of one of these disorders, parents can get genetic testing to see whether they carry the gene. Other genetic tests can tell whether the fetus has the disorder or carries the gene for the disorder.

Treatments may include special diets, supplements, and medicines. Some babies may also need additional treatments, if there are complications. For some disorders, there is no cure, but treatments may help with symptoms.


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Mucopolysaccharidosis type II Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II), also known as Hunter syndrome, is a condition that affects many different parts of the body and occurs almost exclusively in males. It is a progressively debilitating disorder; however, the rate of progression varies among affected individuals.At birth, individuals with MPS II do not display any features of the condition. Between ages 2 and 4, they develop full lips, large rounded cheeks, a broad nose, and an enlarged tongue (macroglossia). The vocal cords also enlarge, which results in a deep, hoarse voice. Narrowing of the airway causes frequent upper respiratory infections and short pauses in breathing during sleep (sleep apnea). As the disorder progresses, individuals need medical assistance to keep their airway open.Many other organs and tissues are affected in MPS II. Individuals with this disorder often have a large head (macrocephaly), a buildup of fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus), an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), and a soft out-pouching around the belly-button (umbilical hernia) or lower abdomen (inguinal hernia). People with MPS II usually have thick skin that is not very stretchy. Some affected individuals also have distinctive white skin growths that look like pebbles. Most people with this disorder develop hearing loss and have recurrent ear infections. Some individuals with MPS II develop problems with the light-sensitive tissue in the back of the eye (retina) and have reduced vision. Carpal tunnel syndrome commonly occurs in children with this disorder and is characterized by numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand and fingers. Narrowing of the spinal canal (spinal stenosis) in the neck can compress and damage the spinal cord. The heart is also significantly affected by MPS II, and many individuals develop heart valve problems. Heart valve abnormalities can cause the heart to become enlarged (ventricular hypertrophy) and can eventually lead to heart failure.Children with MPS II grow steadily until about age 5, and then their growth slows and they develop short stature. Individuals with this condition have joint deformities (contractures) that significantly affect mobility. Most people with MPS II also have dysostosis multiplex, which refers to multiple skeletal abnormalities seen on x-ray. Dysostosis multiplex includes a generalized thickening of most long bones, particularly the ribs.There are two types of MPS II, called the severe and mild types. While both types affect many different organs and tissues as described above, people with severe MPS II also experience a decline in intellectual function and a more rapid disease progression. Individuals with the severe form begin to lose basic functional skills (developmentally regress) between the ages of 6 and 8. The life expectancy of these individuals is 10 to 20 years. Individuals with mild MPS II also have a shortened lifespan, but they typically live into adulthood and their intelligence is not affected. Heart disease and airway obstruction are major causes of death in people with both types of MPS II.
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