2022 ICD-10-CM Code E71.510

Zellweger syndrome

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:E71.510
Short Description:Zellweger syndrome
Long Description:Zellweger syndrome

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Disord of branched-chain amino-acid metab & fatty-acid metab (E71)

E71.510 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of zellweger syndrome. The code E71.510 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code E71.510 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like peroxisome biogenesis disorder or zellweger syndrome.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E71.510 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert E71.510 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code E71.510 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Leukodystrophies

What are leukodystrophies?

Leukodystrophies are a group of rare genetic disorders that affect the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS is made up of your brain and spinal cord. Leukodystrophies damage the white matter of your CNS. The white matter includes

When the white matter is damaged, it can slow down or block the signals between nerve cells. This can cause many different symptoms, including trouble with movement, vision, hearing, and thinking.

There are over 50 types of leukodystrophies. Some types are present at birth, while others may not cause symptoms until a child becomes a toddler. A few types mainly affect adults. Most types get worse over time.

What causes leukodystrophies?

Leukodystrophies are caused by genetic changes. These changes are usually inherited, meaning that they are passed from parent to child.

What are the symptoms of leukodystrophies?

The symptoms of leukodystrophies depend on the type; they can include a gradual loss of

There can also be other symptoms, such as

How are leukodystrophies diagnosed?

Leukodystrophies can be hard to diagnose because there are so many different types which can have different symptoms. Your health care provider may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

What are the treatments for leukodystrophies?

There is no cure for leukodystrophies. Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms and providing support. It may include

Stem cell or bone marrow transplantation can be helpful for a few types of leukodystrophy.

One type of leukodystrophy, CTX, is treatable if it is diagnosed early. It is treated with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) replacement therapy.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


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Zellweger spectrum disorder

Zellweger spectrum disorder is a group of conditions that have overlapping signs and symptoms and affect many parts of the body. This group of conditions includes Zellweger syndrome, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and infantile Refsum disease. These conditions were once thought to be distinct disorders but are now considered to be part of the same condition spectrum. Zellweger syndrome is the most severe form of the Zellweger spectrum disorder, NALD is intermediate in severity, and infantile Refsum disease is the least severe form. Because these three conditions are now considered one disorder, some researchers prefer not to use the separate condition names but to instead refer to cases as severe, intermediate, or mild.

Individuals with Zellweger syndrome, at the severe end of the spectrum, develop signs and symptoms of the condition during the newborn period. These infants experience weak muscle tone (hypotonia), feeding problems, hearing and vision loss, and seizures. These problems are caused by the breakdown of myelin, which is the covering that protects nerves and promotes the efficient transmission of nerve impulses. The part of the brain and spinal cord that contains myelin is called white matter. Destruction of myelin (demyelination) leads to loss of white matter (leukodystrophy). Children with Zellweger syndrome also develop life-threatening problems in other organs and tissues, such as the liver, heart, and kidneys, and their liver or spleen may be enlarged. They may have skeletal abnormalities, including a large space between the bones of the skull (fontanelles) and characteristic bone spots known as chondrodysplasia punctata that can be seen on x-ray. Affected individuals can have eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lenses of the eyes (cataracts) or involuntary, side-to-side movements of the eyes (nystagmus). Zellweger syndrome involves distinctive facial features, including a flattened face, broad nasal bridge, high forehead, and widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism). Children with Zellweger syndrome typically do not survive beyond the first year of life.

People with NALD or infantile Refsum disease, which are at the less-severe end of the spectrum, have more variable features than those with Zellweger syndrome and usually do not develop signs and symptoms of the disease until late infancy or early childhood. They may have many of the features of Zellweger syndrome; however, their condition typically progresses more slowly. Children with these less-severe conditions often have hypotonia, vision problems, hearing loss, liver dysfunction, developmental delay, and some degree of intellectual disability. Most people with NALD survive into childhood, and those with infantile Refsum disease may reach adulthood. In rare cases, individuals at the mildest end of the condition spectrum have developmental delay in childhood and hearing loss or vision problems beginning in adulthood and do not develop the other features of this disorder.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)