2021 ICD-10-CM Code E71.440

Ruvalcaba-Myhre-Smith syndrome

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

E71.440 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of ruvalcaba-myhre-smith syndrome. The code E71.440 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code E71.440 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like bannayan syndrome or pten hamartoma tumor syndrome.

ICD-10:E71.440
Short Description:Ruvalcaba-Myhre-Smith syndrome
Long Description:Ruvalcaba-Myhre-Smith syndrome

Code Classification

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E71.440 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert E71.440 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code E71.440 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Metabolic Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat.

A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. There are different groups of disorders. Some affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy.

You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example.


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Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by a large head size (macrocephaly), multiple noncancerous tumors and tumor-like growths called hamartomas, and dark freckles on the penis in males. The signs and symptoms of Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome are present from birth or become apparent in early childhood.At least half of affected infants have macrocephaly, and many also have a high birth weight and a large body size (macrosomia). Growth usually slows during childhood, so affected adults are of normal height and body size. About half of all children with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome have intellectual disability or delayed development, particularly the development of speech and of motor skills such as sitting, crawling, and walking. These delays may improve with age.About half of all people with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome develop hamartomas in their intestines, known as hamartomatous polyps. Other noncancerous growths often associated with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome include fatty tumors called lipomas and angiolipomas that develop under the skin. Some affected individuals also develop hemangiomas, which are red or purplish growths that consist of tangles of abnormal blood vessels. People with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome may also have an increased risk of developing certain cancers, although researchers are still working to determine the cancer risks associated with this condition.Other signs and symptoms that have been reported in people with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome include weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and other muscle abnormalities, thyroid problems, and seizures. Skeletal abnormalities have also been described with this condition, including an unusually large range of joint movement (hyperextensibility), abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis), and a sunken chest (pectus excavatum).The features of Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome overlap with those of another disorder called Cowden syndrome. People with Cowden syndrome develop hamartomas and other noncancerous growths; they also have an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Both conditions can be caused by mutations in the PTEN gene. Some people with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome have had relatives diagnosed with Cowden syndrome, and other individuals have had the characteristic features of both conditions. Based on these similarities, researchers have proposed that Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome and Cowden syndrome represent a spectrum of overlapping features known as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome instead of two distinct conditions.
[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)