ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q78.0

Osteogenesis imperfecta

Diagnosis Code Q78.0

ICD-10: Q78.0
Short Description: Osteogenesis imperfecta
Long Description: Osteogenesis imperfecta
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q78.0


Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q99)
    • Congenital malformations and deformations of the musculoskeletal system (Q65-Q79)
      • Other osteochondrodysplasias (Q78)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q78.0 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)

  • SPINAL FUSION EXCEPT CERVICAL WITH SPINAL CURVATURE OR MALIGNANCY OR INFECTION OR EXTENSIVE FUSIONS WITH MCC 456
  • SPINAL FUSION EXCEPT CERVICAL WITH SPINAL CURVATURE OR MALIGNANCY OR INFECTION OR EXTENSIVE FUSIONS WITH CC 457
  • SPINAL FUSION EXCEPT CERVICAL WITH SPINAL CURVATURE OR MALIGNANCY OR INFECTION OR EXTENSIVE FUSIONS WITHOUT CC/MCC 458

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 756.51 - Osteogenesis imperfecta

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q78.0 is exempt from POA reporting.

Synonyms
  • Dentinogenesis imperfecta
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta type I
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta type II
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta type II
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta type IIA
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta type IIB
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta type III
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta type IV
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta with blue sclerae AND dentinogenesis imperfecta
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta with blue sclerae AND normal teeth
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta, dominant perinatal lethal
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta, recessive perinatal lethal
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta, recessive perinatal lethal, with microcephaly AND cataracts
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta, type IV A
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta, type IV B
  • Osteoporosis with pseudoglioma

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Q78.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Also called: Brittle bone disease, OI

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder in which bones break easily. Sometimes the bones break for no known reason. OI can also cause weak muscles, brittle teeth, a curved spine, and hearing loss. OI is caused by one of several genes that aren't working properly. When these genes don't work, it affects how you make collagen, a protein that helps make bones strong.

OI can range from mild to severe, and symptoms vary from person to person. A person may have just a few or as many as several hundred fractures in a lifetime.

No single test can identify OI. Your doctor uses your medical and family history, physical exam, and imaging and lab tests to diagnose it. Your doctor may also test your collagen (from skin) or genes (from blood). There is no cure, but you can manage symptoms. Treatments include exercise, pain medicine, physical therapy, wheelchairs, braces, and surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Osteogenesis imperfecta


[Read More]

Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of genetic disorders that mainly affect the bones. The term "osteogenesis imperfecta" means imperfect bone formation. People with this condition have bones that break easily, often from mild trauma or with no apparent cause. Multiple fractures are common, and in severe cases, can occur even before birth. Milder cases may involve only a few fractures over a person's lifetime.There are at least eight recognized forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, designated type I through type VIII. The types can be distinguished by their signs and symptoms, although their characteristic features overlap. Type I is the mildest form of osteogenesis imperfecta and type II is the most severe; other types of this condition have signs and symptoms that fall somewhere between these two extremes. Increasingly, genetic factors are used to define the different forms of osteogenesis imperfecta.The milder forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, including type I, are characterized by bone fractures during childhood and adolescence that often result from minor trauma. Fractures occur less frequently in adulthood. People with mild forms of the condition typically have a blue or grey tint to the part of the eye that is usually white (the sclera), and may develop hearing loss in adulthood. Affected individuals are usually of normal or near normal height.Other types of osteogenesis imperfecta are more severe, causing frequent bone fractures that may begin before birth and result from little or no trauma. Additional features of these conditions can include blue sclerae, short stature, hearing loss, respiratory problems, and a disorder of tooth development called dentinogenesis imperfecta. The most severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, particularly type II, can include an abnormally small, fragile rib cage and underdeveloped lungs. Infants with these abnormalities have life-threatening problems with breathing and often die shortly after birth.
[Read More]

Dentinogenesis imperfecta Dentinogenesis imperfecta is a disorder of tooth development. This condition causes the teeth to be discolored (most often a blue-gray or yellow-brown color) and translucent. Teeth are also weaker than normal, making them prone to rapid wear, breakage, and loss. These problems can affect both primary (baby) teeth and permanent teeth.Researchers have described three types of dentinogenesis imperfecta with similar dental abnormalities. Type I occurs in people who have osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic condition in which bones are brittle and easily broken. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II and type III usually occur in people without other inherited disorders. A few older individuals with type II have had progressive high-frequency hearing loss in addition to dental abnormalities, but it is not known whether this hearing loss is related to dentinogenesis imperfecta.Some researchers believe that dentinogenesis imperfecta type II and type III, along with a condition called dentin dysplasia type II, are actually forms of a single disorder. The signs and symptoms of dentin dysplasia type II are very similar to those of dentinogenesis imperfecta. However, dentin dysplasia type II affects the primary teeth much more than the permanent teeth.
[Read More]
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