2021 ICD-10-CM Code Q78.3

Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia

Version 2021
Billable Code
MS-DRG Mapping
POA Exempt

Valid for Submission

Q78.3 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia. The code Q78.3 is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code Q78.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like craniodiaphyseal dysplasia, diaphyseal dysplasia, diaphyseal dysplasia with anemia, diaphyseal medullary stenosis with bone malignancy or progressive diaphyseal dysplasia. The code is exempt from present on admission (POA) reporting for inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals.

ICD-10:Q78.3
Short Description:Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia
Long Description:Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia

Code Classification

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code Q78.3:


Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code Q78.3 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Present on Admission (POA)

Q78.3 is exempt from POA reporting - The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement. Review other POA exempt codes here .

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
POA Indicator CodePOA Reason for CodeCMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
YDiagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission.YES
NDiagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission.NO
UDocumentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.NO
WClinically undetermined - unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.YES
1Unreported/Not used - Exempt from POA reporting. NO

Convert Q78.3 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code Q78.3 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can range from mild to severe. Causes can include

For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Health care providers can diagnose certain birth defects during pregnancy, with prenatal tests. That's why it important to get regular prenatal care. Other birth defects may not be found until after the baby is born. Sometimes the defect is obvious right away. Other times, the health care provider may not discover it until later in life.

Babies with birth defects often need special care and treatments. The treatments may include surgery, medicines, assistive devices, and therapies.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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Camurati-Engelmann disease Camurati-Engelmann disease is a skeletal condition that is characterized by abnormally thick bones (hyperostosis) in the arms, legs, and skull.The thick limb bones can lead to bone pain and muscle weakness in the arms and legs and cause individuals with Camurati-Engelmann disease to tire quickly. Bone pain ranges from mild to severe and can increase with stress, activity, or cold weather. Leg weakness can make it difficult to stand up from a seated position and some affected individuals develop a waddling or unsteady walk. Additional limb abnormalities include joint deformities (contractures), knock knees, and flat feet (pes planus). Swelling and redness (erythema) of the limbs and an abnormal curvature of the spine can also occur.Individuals with Camurati-Engelmann disease may have an unusually thick skull, which can lead to an abnormally large head (macrocephaly) and lower jaw (mandible), a prominent forehead (frontal bossing), and bulging eyes with shallow eye sockets (ocular proptosis). These changes to the head and face become more prominent with age and are most noticeable in affected adults. In about a quarter of individuals with Camurati-Engelmann disease, the thickened skull increases pressure on the brain or compresses the spinal cord, which can cause a variety of neurological problems, including headaches, hearing loss, vision problems, dizziness (vertigo), ringing in the ears (tinnitus), and facial paralysis.The degree of hyperostosis varies among individuals with Camurati-Engelmann disease as does the age at which they experience their first symptoms.Other, rare features of Camurati-Engelmann disease include abnormally long limbs in proportion to height, a decrease in muscle mass and body fat, delayed teething (dentition), frequent cavities, delayed puberty, a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), thinning of the skin, and excessively sweaty (hyperhidrotic) hands and feet.
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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)