ICD-10-CM Code Q80.2

Lamellar ichthyosis

Version 2020 Billable Code POA Exempt

Valid for Submission

Q80.2 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of lamellar ichthyosis. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code Q80.2 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acral self-healing collodion baby, autosomal dominant lamellar ichthyosis, congenital non bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma, congenital non bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma, congenital non bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma, erythrodermic lamellar ichthyosis, etc The code is exempt from present on admission (POA) reporting for inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals.

ICD-10:Q80.2
Short Description:Lamellar ichthyosis
Long Description:Lamellar ichthyosis

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code Q80.2:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Collodion baby

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code Q80.2 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acral self-healing collodion baby
  • Autosomal dominant lamellar ichthyosis
  • Congenital non bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma
  • Congenital non bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma
  • Congenital non bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma
  • Erythrodermic lamellar ichthyosis
  • Lamellar ichthyosis
  • Lamellar ichthyosis
  • Lamellar ichthyosis AND trichorrhexis invaginata syndrome
  • Non-erythrodermic lamellar ichthyosis
  • Self-healing collodion baby
  • Trichorrhexis

Clinical Information

  • ICHTHYOSIS LAMELLAR-. a chronic congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. infants are usually born encased in a collodion membrane which sheds within a few weeks. scaling is generalized and marked with grayish brown quadrilateral scales adherent at their centers and free at the edges. in some cases scales are so thick that they resemble armored plate.

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code Q80.2 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 606 - MINOR SKIN DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 607 - MINOR SKIN DISORDERS WITHOUT MCC

Present on Admission (POA)

Q80.2 is exempt from POA reporting - The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement. Review other POA exempt codes here .

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
POA Indicator CodePOA Reason for CodeCMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
YDiagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission.YES
NDiagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission.NO
UDocumentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.NO
WClinically undetermined - unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.YES
1Unreported/Not used - Exempt from POA reporting. NO

Convert Q80.2 to ICD-9

  • 757.1 - Ichthyosis congenita (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q99)
    • Other congenital malformations (Q80-Q89)
      • Congenital ichthyosis (Q80)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Skin Conditions

Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin

  • Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration
  • Keeps harmful microbes out, preventing infections
  • Helps you feel things like heat, cold, and pain
  • Keeps your body temperature even
  • Makes vitamin D when the sun shines on it

Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


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Lamellar ichthyosis Lamellar ichthyosis is a condition that mainly affects the skin. Infants with this condition are typically born with a tight, clear sheath covering their skin called a collodion membrane. This membrane usually dries and peels off during the first few weeks of life, and then it becomes obvious that affected babies have scaly skin, and eyelids and lips that are turned outward. People with lamellar ichthyosis typically have large, dark, plate-like scales covering their skin on most of their body. Infants with lamellar ichthyosis may develop infections, an excessive loss of fluids (dehydration), and respiratory problems. Affected individuals may also have hair loss (alopecia), abnormally formed fingernails and toenails (nail dystrophy), a decreased ability to sweat (hypohidrosis), an increased sensitivity to heat, and a thickening of the skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet (keratoderma). Less frequently, affected individuals have reddened skin (erythema) and joint deformities (contractures).
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