ICD-10-CM Code K31.89

Other diseases of stomach and duodenum

Version 2020 Replaced Code Billable Code

Valid for Submission

K31.89 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other diseases of stomach and duodenum. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code K31.89 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like abnormal gastric motility, achylia gastrica, acquired deformity of duodenum, acquired megaduodenum, acute gastric ulcer with hemorrhage and obstruction, acute gastric ulcer with obstruction, etc

ICD-10:K31.89
Short Description:Other diseases of stomach and duodenum
Long Description:Other diseases of stomach and duodenum

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • R11.15 - Cyclical vomiting syndrome unrelated to migraine

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code K31.89 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Abnormal gastric motility
  • Achylia gastrica
  • Acquired deformity of duodenum
  • Acquired megaduodenum
  • Acute gastric ulcer with hemorrhage AND obstruction
  • Acute gastric ulcer with obstruction
  • Acute gastric ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation
  • Acute gastric ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation but with obstruction
  • Acute gastric volvulus
  • Acute peptic ulcer with hemorrhage AND obstruction
  • Acute peptic ulcer with obstruction
  • Chronic gastric ulcer with hemorrhage AND with obstruction
  • Chronic gastric ulcer with hemorrhage AND with perforation
  • Chronic gastric ulcer with hemorrhage, with perforation AND with obstruction
  • Chronic gastric ulcer with obstruction
  • Chronic gastric ulcer with perforation AND with obstruction
  • Chronic gastric ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation
  • Chronic gastric ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation but with obstruction
  • Chronic gastric volvulus
  • Chronic hypertrophic pyloric gastropathy
  • Chronic peptic ulcer with hemorrhage AND obstruction
  • Chronic peptic ulcer with hemorrhage AND perforation
  • Chronic peptic ulcer with hemorrhage, with perforation AND with obstruction
  • Chronic peptic ulcer with obstruction
  • Chronic peptic ulcer with perforation AND obstruction
  • Chronic peptic ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation
  • Chronic peptic ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation but with obstruction
  • Chronic torsion of stomach
  • Complication of gastrostomy
  • Congestive duodenopathy
  • Cyst of stomach
  • Deformed duodenal cap
  • Delayed perforation of stomach
  • Disorder of function of stomach
  • Duodenal anastomotic dehiscence
  • Duodenal anastomotic leak
  • Duodenal stump leak
  • Dysmotility of stomach
  • Erythematous duodenopathy
  • Excessive fluid in stomach
  • Extrinsic compression of stomach
  • Focal foveolar hyperplasia
  • Foveolar hyperplasia
  • Functional disorder of gastrointestinal tract
  • Functional disorder of stomach
  • Gastric anastomotic necrosis
  • Gastric anastomotic stricture
  • Gastric atonia
  • Gastric dilatation-volvulus-torsion syndrome
  • Gastric necrosis
  • Gastric necrosis
  • Gastric retention
  • Gastric retention
  • Gastric rupture
  • Gastric spasm
  • Gastric ulcer with hemorrhage, with perforation AND with obstruction
  • Gastric ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation
  • Gastric ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation but with obstruction
  • Gastric volvulus
  • Gastric xanthelasma
  • Gastrointestinal anastomotic dehiscence
  • Gastrointestinal anastomotic leak
  • Gastrointestinal anastomotic necrosis
  • Gastrointestinal anastomotic stricture
  • Gastrointestinal hypomotility
  • Gastromalacia
  • Gastroptosis
  • Hourglass contraction of stomach
  • Hyperchlorhydria
  • Hyperplasia of Brunner glands of duodenum
  • Hypertrophic gastropathy
  • Hypochlorhydria
  • Impaired gastric mucosal defense
  • Increased gastric electrical activity
  • Increased gastric HCO>3<^-^ secretion
  • Increased gastric tonus
  • Increased sensitivity of parietal cells to secretagogues
  • Intestinal metaplasia of gastric cardia
  • Intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa
  • Isolated idiopathic granuloma of stomach
  • Leakage from pyloroplasty
  • Malakoplakia
  • Malakoplakia of stomach
  • Megaduodenum
  • Mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus
  • Mixed gastric volvulus
  • Mucosal diaphragm of gastric antrum
  • Non-hypoproteinemic hypertrophic gastropathy
  • Nontraumatic gastric rupture
  • Organoaxial gastric volvulus
  • Passive congestion of stomach
  • Peptic ulcer with perforation AND obstruction
  • Peptic ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation
  • Peptic ulcer without hemorrhage AND without perforation but with obstruction
  • Perforation of stomach
  • Periodic syndrome
  • Portal hypertensive gastropathy
  • Postoperative gastric retention
  • Primary chronic pseudo-obstruction of gastrointestinal tract
  • Primary chronic pseudo-obstruction of stomach
  • Retained antrum syndrome
  • Stomach dysfunction following gastrostomy
  • Stomach hematoma
  • Ulcerogenic deformed duodenum
  • Vascular disorder of the stomach
  • Vascular ectasia of stomach

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code K31.89 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 391 - ESOPHAGITIS, GASTROENTERITIS AND MISCELLANEOUS DIGESTIVE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 392 - ESOPHAGITIS, GASTROENTERITIS AND MISCELLANEOUS DIGESTIVE DISORDERS WITHOUT MCC

Convert K31.89 to ICD-9

  • 537.5 - Gastroptosis (Approximate Flag)
  • 537.89 - Gastroduodenal dis NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the digestive system (K00–K93)
    • Diseases of esophagus, stomach and duodenum (K20-K31)
      • Other diseases of stomach and duodenum (K31)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Stomach Disorders

Your stomach is an organ between your esophagus and small intestine. It is where digestion of protein begins. The stomach has three tasks. It stores swallowed food. It mixes the food with stomach acids. Then it sends the mixture on to the small intestine.

Most people have a problem with their stomach at one time or another. Indigestion and heartburn are common problems. You can relieve some stomach problems with over-the-counter medicines and lifestyle changes, such as avoiding fatty foods or eating more slowly. Other problems like peptic ulcers or GERD require medical attention.

You should see a doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Blood when you have a bowel movement
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Heartburn not relieved by antacids
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Ongoing vomiting or diarrhea

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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