ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D44.6

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body

Diagnosis Code D44.6

ICD-10: D44.6
Short Description: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body
Long Description: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of carotid body
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D44.6

Valid for Submission
The code D44.6 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Neoplasms of uncertain behavior, polycythemia vera and myelodysplastic syndromes (D37-D48)
      • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of endocrine glands (D44)

Table of Neoplasms

The code D44.6 is included in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

The Tabular must be reviewed for the complete diagnosis code.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»carotid (artery)
  »body
C75.4C79.89D35.5D44.6D49.7

Information for Patients


Carotid Artery Disease

Your carotid arteries are two large blood vessels in your neck. They supply your brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. This is the buildup of cholesterol and other material in an artery. If a blood clot sticks in the narrowed arteries, blood can't reach your brain. This is one of the causes of stroke.

Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are tests that can tell your doctor if you have it. If the arteries are very narrow, you may need an operation called an endarterectomy to remove the plaque. For less severe narrowing, a medicine to prevent blood clots can reduce your risk of stroke. Another option for people who can't have surgery is carotid angioplasty. This involves placing balloons and/or stents into the artery to open it and hold it open.

  • Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery stenosis -- self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid artery surgery - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carotid duplex (Medical Encyclopedia)


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