ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D36.17

Ben neoplm of prph nerves and autonm nrv sys of trunk, unsp

Diagnosis Code D36.17

ICD-10: D36.17
Short Description: Ben neoplm of prph nerves and autonm nrv sys of trunk, unsp
Long Description: Benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves and autonomic nervous system of trunk, unspecified
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D36.17

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified sites (D36)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code D36.17 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves of trunk

Information for Patients

Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

Also called: Dysautonomia

Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart and the widening or narrowing of your blood vessels. When something goes wrong in this system, it can cause serious problems, including

  • Blood pressure problems
  • Heart problems
  • Trouble with breathing and swallowing
  • Erectile dysfunction in men

Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result of another disease, such as Parkinson's disease, alcoholism and diabetes. Problems can affect either part of the system, as in complex regional pain syndromes, or all of the system. Some types are temporary, but many worsen over time. When they affect your breathing or heart function, these disorders can be life-threatening.

Some autonomic nervous system disorders get better when an underlying disease is treated. Often, however, there is no cure. In that case, the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Autonomic neuropathy
  • Multiple system atrophy

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Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign cancer, Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Biopsy - polyps
  • Cherry angioma

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Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Also called: Neuritis, Peripheral neuritis, Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body.

There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders.

Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include

  • Numbness
  • Pain
  • Burning or tingling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Axillary nerve dysfunction
  • Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction
  • Distal median nerve dysfunction
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia
  • Metabolic neuropathies
  • Mononeuritis multiplex
  • Neuralgia
  • Neuropathy secondary to drugs
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Radial nerve dysfunction
  • Sensorimotor polyneuropathy
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction

[Read More]
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