ICD-10-CM Code D36.13

Benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves and autonomic nervous system of lower limb, including hip

Version 2021 Billable Code Neoplasm Benign

Valid for Submission

D36.13 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves and autonomic nervous system of lower limb, including hip. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code D36.13 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves of hip, benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves of lower limb, neoplasm of peripheral nerves of hip, neoplasm of peripheral nerves of lower limb, neurofibroma of lower limb, neuroma of foot, etc

The following anatomical sites found in the Table of Neoplasms apply to this code given the correct histological behavior: Neoplasm, neoplastic nerve (ganglion) femoral ; Neoplasm, neoplastic nerve (ganglion) obturator ; Neoplasm, neoplastic nerve (ganglion) peripheral NEC ankle ; Neoplasm, neoplastic nerve (ganglion) peripheral NEC calf ; Neoplasm, neoplastic nerve (ganglion) peripheral NEC extremity lower ; Neoplasm, neoplastic nerve (ganglion) peripheral NEC foot ; Neoplasm, neoplastic nerve (ganglion) peripheral NEC heel ; etc

ICD-10:D36.13
Short Description:Ben neoplm of prph nrv & autonm nrv sys of low lmb, inc hip
Long Description:Benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves and autonomic nervous system of lower limb, including hip

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves of hip
  • Benign neoplasm of peripheral nerves of lower limb
  • Neoplasm of peripheral nerves of hip
  • Neoplasm of peripheral nerves of lower limb
  • Neurofibroma of lower limb
  • Neuroma of foot
  • Neuroma of lower limb
  • Neuroma of lower limb
  • Post surgical neuroma of lower limb
  • Schwannoma of nerve of lower limb

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code D36.13 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 564 - OTHER MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 565 - OTHER MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 566 - OTHER MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert D36.13 to ICD-9

  • 215.9 - Ben neo soft tissue NOS (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified sites (D36)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Table of Neoplasms

The code D36.13 is included in the table of neoplasms by anatomical site. For each site there are six possible code numbers according to whether the neoplasm in question is malignant, benign, in situ, of uncertain behavior, or of unspecified nature. The description of the neoplasm will often indicate which of the six columns is appropriate.

Where such descriptors are not present, the remainder of the Index should be consulted where guidance is given to the appropriate column for each morphological (histological) variety listed. However, the guidance in the Index can be overridden if one of the descriptors mentioned above is present.

Neoplasm, neoplastic Malignant
Primary
Malignant
Secondary
CaInSitu Benign Uncertain
Behavior
Unspecified
Behavior
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »femoral
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »obturator
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »ankle
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »calf
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »extremity
        »lower
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »foot
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »heel
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »hip
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »knee
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »leg
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »limb NEC
        »lower
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »popliteal fossa or space
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »thigh
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »peripheral NEC
      »toe
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »nerve (ganglion)
    »sciatic
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2
»Neoplasm, neoplastic
  »sciatic nerve
C47.2C79.89D36.13D48.2D49.2

Information for Patients


Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

Also called: Dysautonomia

Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart and the widening or narrowing of your blood vessels. When something goes wrong in this system, it can cause serious problems, including

  • Blood pressure problems
  • Heart problems
  • Trouble with breathing and swallowing
  • Erectile dysfunction in men

Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result of another disease, such as Parkinson's disease, alcoholism and diabetes. Problems can affect either part of the system, as in complex regional pain syndromes, or all of the system. Some types are temporary, but many worsen over time. When they affect your breathing or heart function, these disorders can be life-threatening.

Some autonomic nervous system disorders get better when an underlying disease is treated. Often, however, there is no cure. In that case, the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Autonomic neuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Multiple system atrophy (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Biopsy - polyps (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cherry angioma (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Also called: Neuritis, Peripheral neuritis, Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body.

There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders.

Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include

  • Numbness
  • Pain
  • Burning or tingling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Axillary nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Distal median nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metabolic neuropathies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mononeuritis multiplex (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuropathy secondary to drugs (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Peripheral neuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Sensorimotor polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]