ICD-10-CM Code R87.612

Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on cytologic smear of cervix (LGSIL)

Version 2020 Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx Diagnoses For Females Only OB/GYN

Valid for Submission

R87.612 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on cytologic smear of cervix (lgsil). The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code R87.612 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like abnormal cervical papanicolaou smear or cervicovaginal cytology: low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on cervical papanicolaou smear.

The code R87.612 is applicable to female patients only. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient.

The code is commonly used in ob/gyn medical specialties to specify clinical concepts such as abnormal female genital cytology.

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

ICD-10:R87.612
Short Description:Low grade intrepith lesion cyto smr crvx (LGSIL)
Long Description:Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on cytologic smear of cervix (LGSIL)

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R87.612 are found in the index:


Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10 Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Diagnoses for females only - Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, this code applies to FEMALES only .

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Abnormal cervical Papanicolaou smear
  • Cervicovaginal cytology: Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion
  • Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on cervical Papanicolaou smear

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code R87.612 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 742 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC
  • 743 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert R87.612 to ICD-9

  • 795.03 - Pap smear cervix w LGSIL

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Abnormal findings on examination of other body fluids, substances and tissues, without diagnosis (R83-R89)
      • Abnormal findings in specimens from female genital organs (R87)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Cervical Cancer Screening

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any symptoms. Cancer found early may be easier to treat.

Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health checkup. There are two types of tests: the Pap test and the HPV test. For both, the doctor or nurse collects cells from the surface of the cervix. With the Pap test, the lab checks the sample for cancer cells or abnormal cells that could become cancer later. With the HPV test, the lab checks for HPV infection. HPV is a virus that spreads through sexual contact. It can sometimes lead to cancer. If your screening tests are abnormal, your doctor may do more tests, such as a biopsy.

Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be wrong, and you may have unnecessary follow-up tests. There are also benefits. Screening has been shown to decrease the number of deaths from cervical cancer. You and your doctor should discuss your risk for cervical cancer, the pros and cons of the screening tests, at what age to start being screened, and how often to be screened.


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Cervix Disorders

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. The cervix has a small opening that expands during childbirth. It also allows menstrual blood to leave a woman's body.

Your health care provider may perform a Pap test during your health checkup to look for changes to the cells of the cervix, including cervical cancer. Other problems with the cervix include:

  • Cervicitis - inflammation of the cervix. This is usually from an infection.
  • Cervical incompetence - This can happen during pregnancy. The opening of the cervix widens long before the baby is due.
  • Cervical polyps and cysts - abnormal growths on the cervix

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