ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R87.612

Low grade intrepith lesion cyto smr crvx (LGSIL)

Diagnosis Code R87.612

ICD-10: R87.612
Short Description: Low grade intrepith lesion cyto smr crvx (LGSIL)
Long Description: Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on cytologic smear of cervix (LGSIL)
This is the 2019 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R87.612

Valid for Submission
The code R87.612 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Abnormal findings on examination of other body fluids, substances and tissues, without diagnosis (R83-R89)
      • Abnormal findings in specimens from female genital organs (R87)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for females only - Diagnoses for females only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code R87.612 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V35.0)

  • 742 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC
  • 743 - UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9
  • 795.03 - Pap smear cervix w LGSIL

Synonyms
  • Abnormal cervical Papanicolaou smear
  • Cervicovaginal cytology: Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion
  • Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion on cervical Papanicolaou smear

Information for Patients


Cervical Cancer Screening

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any symptoms. Cancer found early may be easier to treat.

Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health checkup. There are two types of tests: the Pap test and the HPV test. For both, the doctor or nurse collects cells from the surface of the cervix. With the Pap test, the lab checks the sample for cancer cells or abnormal cells that could become cancer later. With the HPV test, the lab checks for HPV infection. HPV is a virus that spreads through sexual contact. It can sometimes lead to cancer. If your screening tests are abnormal, your doctor may do more tests, such as a biopsy.

Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be wrong, and you may have unnecessary follow-up tests. There are also benefits. Screening has been shown to decrease the number of deaths from cervical cancer. You and your doctor should discuss your risk for cervical cancer, the pros and cons of the screening tests, at what age to start being screened, and how often to be screened.

  • Cervical cancer -- screening and prevention (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • HPV DNA test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pap and HPV Testing - NIH (National Cancer Institute)
  • Pap smear (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

Cervix Disorders

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. The cervix has a small opening that expands during childbirth. It also allows menstrual blood to leave a woman's body.

Your health care provider may perform a Pap test during your health checkup to look for changes to the cells of the cervix, including cervical cancer. Other problems with the cervix include:

  • Cervicitis - inflammation of the cervix. This is usually from an infection.
  • Cervical incompetence - This can happen during pregnancy. The opening of the cervix widens long before the baby is due.
  • Cervical polyps and cysts - abnormal growths on the cervix
  • Cervical dysplasia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cervical polyps (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cervicitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cervix treatment - cryosurgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cold knife cone biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Endocervical gram stain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Insufficient cervix (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Nabothian cyst (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Read More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Present on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

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