2024 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code R87.811

Vaginal high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test positive

ICD-10-CM Code:
R87.811
ICD-10 Code for:
Vaginal high risk HPV DNA test positive
Is Billable?
Yes - Valid for Submission
Chronic Condition Indicator: [1]
Not chronic
Code Navigator:

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
    (R00–R99)
    • Abnormal findings on examination of other body fluids, substances and tissues, without diagnosis
      (R83-R89)
      • Abnormal findings in specimens from female genital organs
        (R87)

R87.811 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of vaginal high risk human papillomavirus (hpv) dna test positive. The code is valid during the current fiscal year for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions from October 01, 2023 through September 30, 2024.

This code is applicable to female patients only. It is clinically and virtually impossible to use this code on a non-female patient.

The code is commonly used in ob/gyn medical specialties to specify clinical concepts such as abnormal female genital cytology.

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • High risk human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid detected
  • High risk human papillomavirus detected
  • Human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid detected
  • Human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid detected, high risk on vaginal specimen

Clinical Classification

Index to Diseases and Injuries References

The following annotation back-references for this diagnosis code are found in the injuries and diseases index. The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10-CM code(s).

Code Edits

The Medicare Code Editor (MCE) detects and reports errors in the coding of claims data. The following ICD-10-CM Code Edits are applicable to this code:

  • Diagnoses for females only - The Medicare Code Editor detects inconsistencies between a patient’s sex and any diagnosis on the patient’s record, these edits apply to FEMALES only .

Convert R87.811 to ICD-9-CM

  • ICD-9-CM Code: 795.15 - Vag hi risk HPV-DNA pos
    Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Patient Education


HPV

What is HPV?

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of related viruses. They can cause warts on different parts of your body. There are more than 200 types. About 40 of them are spread through direct sexual contact with someone who has the virus. They can also spread through other intimate, skin-to-skin contact. Some of these types can cause cancer.

There are two categories of sexually transmitted HPV. Low-risk HPV can cause warts on or around your genitals, anus, mouth, or throat. High-risk HPV can cause various cancers:

  • Cervical cancer
  • Anal cancer
  • Some types of oral and throat cancer
  • Vulvar cancer
  • Vaginal cancer
  • Penile cancer

Most HPV infections go away on their own and don't cause cancer. But sometimes the infections last longer. When a high-risk HPV infection lasts for many years, it can lead to cell changes. If these changes are not treated, they may get worse over time and become cancer.

Who is at risk for HPV infections?

HPV infections are very common. Nearly all sexually active people are infected with HPV soon after they become sexually active.

What are the symptoms of HPV infections?

Some people develop warts from certain low-risk HPV infections, but the other types (including the high-risk types) have no symptoms.

If a high-risk HPV infection lasts for many years and causes cell changes, you may have symptoms. You may also have symptoms if those cell changes develop into cancer. Which symptoms you have depends on which part of the body is affected.

How are HPV infections diagnosed?

Health care providers can usually diagnose warts by looking at them.

For women, there are cervical cancer screening tests which can find changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. As part of the screening, women may have Pap tests, HPV tests , or both.

What are the treatments for HPV infections?

An HPV infection itself cannot be treated. There are medicines that you can apply to a wart. If they don't work, your health care provide could freeze, burn, or surgically remove it.

There are treatments for the cell changes caused by infection with high-risk HPV. They include medicines that you apply to the area that is affected and various surgical procedures.

People who have HPV-related cancers usually get the same types of treatment as people who have cancers that are not caused by HPV. An exception to this is for people who have certain oral and throat cancers. They may have different treatment options.

Can HPV infections be prevented?

Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading HPV. If your or your partner is allergic to latex, you can use polyurethane condoms. The most reliable way to avoid infection is to not have anal, vaginal, or oral sex.

Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer. The vaccines provide the most protection when people get them before they are exposed to the virus. This means that it is best for people to get them before they become sexually active.

NIH: National Cancer Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2024 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2023 through 9/30/2024
  • FY 2023 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2022 through 9/30/2023
  • FY 2022 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2021 through 9/30/2022
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016. This was the first year ICD-10-CM was implemented into the HIPAA code set.

Footnotes

[1] Not chronic - A diagnosis code that does not fit the criteria for chronic condition (duration, ongoing medical treatment, and limitations) is considered not chronic. Some codes designated as not chronic are acute conditions. Other diagnosis codes that indicate a possible chronic condition, but for which the duration of the illness is not specified in the code description (i.e., we do not know the condition has lasted 12 months or longer) also are considered not chronic.