ICD-10-CM Code M31.6

Other giant cell arteritis

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

M31.6 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other giant cell arteritis. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code M31.6 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like cerebral arteritis, cerebral arteritis in giant cell arteritis, giant cell arteritis, giant cell arteritis, giant cell arteritis without polymyalgia rheumatica, temporal arteritis, etc

ICD-10:M31.6
Short Description:Other giant cell arteritis
Long Description:Other giant cell arteritis

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code M31.6 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Cerebral arteritis
  • Cerebral arteritis in giant cell arteritis
  • Giant cell arteritis
  • Giant cell arteritis
  • Giant cell arteritis without polymyalgia rheumatica
  • Temporal arteritis
  • Temporal arteritis

Clinical Information

  • GIANT CELL ARTERITIS-. a systemic autoimmune disorder that typically affects medium and large arteries usually leading to occlusive granulomatous vasculitis with transmural infiltrate containing multinucleated giant cells. the temporal artery is commonly involved. this disorder appears primarily in people over the age of 50. symptoms include fever; fatigue; headache; visual impairment; pain in the jaw and tongue; and aggravation of pain by cold temperatures. from adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code M31.6 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 545 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 546 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 547 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert M31.6 to ICD-9

  • 446.5 - Giant cell arteritis (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36)
      • Other necrotizing vasculopathies (M31)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Giant Cell Arteritis

Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. It narrows the arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia rheumatica. Both are more common in women than in men. They almost always affect people over the age of 50.

Early symptoms of giant cell arteritis resemble the flu: fatigue, loss of appetite, and fever. Other symptoms include

  • Headaches
  • Pain and tenderness over the temples
  • Double vision or visual loss, dizziness
  • Problems with coordination and balance
  • Pain in your jaw and tongue

Your doctor will make the diagnosis based on your medical history, symptoms, and a physical exam. There is no single test to diagnose giant cell arteritis, but you may have tests that measure inflammation.

Treatment is usually with corticosteroids. Early treatment is important; otherwise there is a risk of permanent vision loss or stroke. However, when properly treated, giant cell arteritis rarely comes back.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


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