ICD-10-CM Code G91

Hydrocephalus

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

G91 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of hydrocephalus. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:G91
Short Description:Hydrocephalus
Long Description:Hydrocephalus

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • G91.0 - Communicating hydrocephalus
  • G91.1 - Obstructive hydrocephalus
  • G91.2 - (Idiopathic) normal pressure hydrocephalus
  • G91.3 - Post-traumatic hydrocephalus, unspecified
  • G91.4 - Hydrocephalus in diseases classified elsewhere
  • G91.8 - Other hydrocephalus
  • G91.9 - ... unspecified

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code G91:

Includes

Includes
This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • acquired hydrocephalus

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Arnold-Chiari syndrome with hydrocephalus Q07
  • congenital hydrocephalus Q03
  • spina bifida with hydrocephalus Q05

Clinical Information

  • DANDY WALKER SYNDROME-. a congenital abnormality of the central nervous system marked by failure of the midline structures of the cerebellum to develop dilation of the fourth ventricle and upward displacement of the transverse sinuses tentorium and torcula. clinical features include occipital bossing progressive head enlargement bulging of anterior fontanelle papilledema ataxia gait disturbances nystagmus and intellectual compromise. from menkes textbook of child neurology 5th ed pp294 5
  • HYDROCEPHALUS-. excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the cranium which may be associated with dilation of cerebral ventricles intracranial hypertension; headache; lethargy; urinary incontinence; and ataxia.
  • HYDROCEPHALUS NORMAL PRESSURE-. a form of compensated hydrocephalus characterized clinically by a slowly progressive gait disorder see gait disorders neurologic progressive intellectual decline and urinary incontinence. spinal fluid pressure tends to be in the high normal range. this condition may result from processes which interfere with the absorption of csf including subarachnoid hemorrhage chronic meningitis and other conditions. from adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed pp631 3
  • WALKER WARBURG SYNDROME-. rare autosomal recessive lissencephaly type 2 associated with congenital muscular dystrophy and eye anomalies e.g. retinal detachment; cataract; microphthalmos. it is often associated with additional brain malformations such as hydrocephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia and is the most severe form of the group of related syndromes alpha dystroglycanopathies with common congenital abnormalities in the brain eye and muscle development.

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Other disorders of the nervous system (G89-G99)
      • Hydrocephalus (G91)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Hydrocephalus

Also called: Water on the brain

Hydrocephalus is the buildup of too much cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Normally, this fluid cushions your brain. When you have too much, though, it puts harmful pressure on your brain.

Hydrocephalus can be congenital, or present at birth. Causes include genetic problems and problems with how the fetus develops. An unusually large head is the main sign of congenital hydrocephalus.

Hydrocephalus can also happen after birth. This is called acquired hydrocephalus. It can occur at any age. Causes can include head injuries, strokes, infections, tumors, and bleeding in the brain. Symptoms include

  • Headache
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Blurry vision
  • Balance problems
  • Bladder control problems
  • Thinking and memory problems

Hydrocephalus can permanently damage the brain, causing problems with physical and mental development. If untreated, it is usually fatal. With treatment, many people lead normal lives with few limitations. Treatment usually involves surgery to insert a shunt. A shunt is a flexible but sturdy plastic tube. The shunt moves the cerebrospinal fluid to another area of the body where it can be absorbed. Medicine and rehabilitation therapy can also help.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Brain surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hydrocephalus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)

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