ICD-10-CM Code G91.3

Post-traumatic hydrocephalus, unspecified

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

G91.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of post-traumatic hydrocephalus, unspecified. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code G91.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like communicating hydrocephalus due to and following traumatic hemorrhage or post-traumatic hydrocephalus.

ICD-10:G91.3
Short Description:Post-traumatic hydrocephalus, unspecified
Long Description:Post-traumatic hydrocephalus, unspecified

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code G91.3 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Communicating hydrocephalus due to and following traumatic hemorrhage
  • Post-traumatic hydrocephalus

Clinical Information

  • HYDROCEPHALUS-. excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the cranium which may be associated with dilation of cerebral ventricles intracranial hypertension; headache; lethargy; urinary incontinence; and ataxia.

Convert G91.3 to ICD-9

  • 331.4 - Obstructiv hydrocephalus (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Other disorders of the nervous system (G89-G99)
      • Hydrocephalus (G91)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Hydrocephalus

Also called: Water on the brain

Hydrocephalus is the buildup of too much cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Normally, this fluid cushions your brain. When you have too much, though, it puts harmful pressure on your brain.

Hydrocephalus can be congenital, or present at birth. Causes include genetic problems and problems with how the fetus develops. An unusually large head is the main sign of congenital hydrocephalus.

Hydrocephalus can also happen after birth. This is called acquired hydrocephalus. It can occur at any age. Causes can include head injuries, strokes, infections, tumors, and bleeding in the brain. Symptoms include

  • Headache
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Blurry vision
  • Balance problems
  • Bladder control problems
  • Thinking and memory problems

Hydrocephalus can permanently damage the brain, causing problems with physical and mental development. If untreated, it is usually fatal. With treatment, many people lead normal lives with few limitations. Treatment usually involves surgery to insert a shunt. A shunt is a flexible but sturdy plastic tube. The shunt moves the cerebrospinal fluid to another area of the body where it can be absorbed. Medicine and rehabilitation therapy can also help.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Brain surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hydrocephalus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)

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