ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z83.1

Family history of other infectious and parasitic diseases

Diagnosis Code Z83.1

ICD-10: Z83.1
Short Description: Family history of other infectious and parasitic diseases
Long Description: Family history of other infectious and parasitic diseases
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z83.1

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Family history of other specific disorders (Z83)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis Additional informationCallout TooltipUnacceptable principal diagnosis
There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • V18.8 - Fm hx-infect/parasit dis

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Z83.1 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Family history of helminth infection
  • Family history of infectious disease
  • Family history of viral hepatitis type C
  • Family history: Breast disease
  • Family history: Gonorrhea
  • Family history: Hepatitis
  • Family history: Liver disease
  • Family history: Syphilis
  • Family history: Tuberculosis
  • Maternal active tuberculosis
  • Maternal active tuberculosis - untreated
  • Maternal herpes simplex infection of skin of breast
  • Maternal human T-lymphotrophic virus type I infection
  • Maternal human T-lymphotrophic virus type II infection
  • Maternal infection
  • Maternal varicella infection
  • Maternal varicella infection - untreated

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Z83.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Read More]

Infectious Diseases

Also called: Communicable diseases

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking or breathing something that contains a germ. Germs can also spread through animal and insect bites, kissing and sexual contact. Vaccines, proper hand washing and medicines can help prevent infections.

There are four main kinds of germs:

  • Bacteria - one-celled germs that multiply quickly and may release chemicals which can make you sick
  • Viruses - capsules that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply
  • Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew
  • Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

[Read More]

Parasitic Diseases

Parasites are living things that use other living things - like your body - for food and a place to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not.

Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts of the world.

If you are traveling, it's important to drink only water you know is safe. Prevention is especially important. There are no vaccines for parasitic diseases. Some medicines are available to treat parasitic infections.

  • Amebiasis
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Ascariasis
  • Creeping eruption
  • Stool ova and parasites exam
  • Taeniasis

[Read More]
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