ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T39.395D

Adverse effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, subs

Diagnosis Code T39.395D

ICD-10: T39.395D
Short Description: Adverse effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, subs
Long Description: Adverse effect of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAID], subsequent encounter
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T39.395D

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Nonopioid analgesics, antipyretics and antirheumatics (T39)

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients

Drug Reactions

Also called: Side effects

Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions.

One problem is interactions, which may occur between

  • Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners
  • Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit
  • Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners
  • Drugs and diseases, such as aspirin and peptic ulcers

Interactions can change the actions of one or both drugs. The drugs might not work, or you could get side effects.

Side effects are unwanted effects caused by the drugs. Most are mild, such as a stomach aches or drowsiness, and go away after you stop taking the drug. Others can be more serious.

Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin reactions, such as hives and rashes, are the most common type. Anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction, is more rare.

When you start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, make sure you understand how to take it correctly. Know which other medications and foods you need to avoid. Ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

  • Angioedema
  • Drug allergies
  • Drug-induced diarrhea
  • Drug-induced tremor
  • Taking multiple medicines safely

[Read More]

Pain Relievers

Also called: Analgesics, Pain killers, Pain medicines

Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There are many different pain medicines, and each one has advantages and risks. Some types of pain respond better to certain medicines than others. Each person may also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for many types of pain. There are two main types of OTC pain medicines: acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin, naproxen (Aleve), and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) are examples of OTC NSAIDs.

If OTC medicines don't relieve your pain, your doctor may prescribe something stronger. Many NSAIDs are also available at higher prescription doses. The most powerful pain relievers are narcotics. They are very effective, but they can sometimes have serious side effects. Because of the risks, you must use them only under a doctor's supervision.

There are many things you can do to help ease pain. Pain relievers are just one part of a pain treatment plan.

  • Acetaminophen dosing for children
  • Ibuprofen dosing for children
  • Over-the-counter pain relievers
  • Pain medications - narcotics
  • Taking narcotics for back pain

[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code T39.395A
Next Code
T39.395S Next Code