ICD-10-CM Code T38.816

Underdosing of anterior pituitary [adenohypophyseal] hormones

Version 2020 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code Underdosing

Not Valid for Submission

T38.816 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of underdosing of anterior pituitary [adenohypophyseal] hormones. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:T38.816
Short Description:Underdosing of anterior pituitary hormones
Long Description:Underdosing of anterior pituitary [adenohypophyseal] hormones

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • T38.816A - Underdosing of anterior pituitary [adenohypophyseal] hormones, initial encounter
  • T38.816D - Underdosing of anterior pituitary [adenohypophyseal] hormones, subsequent encounter
  • T38.816S - Underdosing of anterior pituitary [adenohypophyseal] hormones, sequela

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • K59.03 - Drug induced constipation

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Hormones and their synthetic substitutes and antag, NEC (T38)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T38.816 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. Use as many codes as necessary to describe all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
ACTHT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
Adrenocorticotrophic hormoneT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
AdrenocorticotrophinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
AlsactideT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
Anterior pituitary hormone NECT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
CorticotropinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
CosyntropinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
Follicle-stimulating hormone, humanT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
FSHT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
Growth hormoneT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
HGH (human growth hormone)T38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
Luteinizing hormoneT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
MenotropinsT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
PergonalT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
ProlactinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
SeractideT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
SomatotropinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
SomatremT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
SomatropinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
TetracosactideT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
TetracosactrinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
Thyreotrophic hormoneT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
ThyrotrophinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
Thyrotropic hormoneT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
TSHT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816
UrofollitropinT38.811T38.812T38.813T38.814T38.815T38.816

Information for Patients


Hormones

Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work slowly, over time, and affect many different processes, including

  • Growth and development
  • Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat
  • Sexual function
  • Reproduction
  • Mood

Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreas. In addition, men produce hormones in their testes and women produce them in their ovaries.

Hormones are powerful. It takes only a tiny amount to cause big changes in cells or even your whole body. That is why too much or too little of a certain hormone can be serious. Laboratory tests can measure the hormone levels in your blood, urine, or saliva. Your health care provider may perform these tests if you have symptoms of a hormone disorder. Home pregnancy tests are similar - they test for pregnancy hormones in your urine.


[Learn More]

Medication Errors

Medicines treat infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used correctly. Errors can happen in the hospital, at the health care provider's office, at the pharmacy, or at home. You can help prevent errors by

  • Knowing your medicines. When you get a prescription, ask the name of the medicine and check to make sure that the pharmacy gave you the right medicine. Make sure that you understand how often you should take the medicine and how long you should take it.
  • Keeping a list of medicines.
    • Write down all of the medicines that you are taking, including the names of your medicines, how much you take, and when you take them. Make sure to include any over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, supplements, and herbs that you take.
    • List the medicines that you are allergic to or that have caused you problems in the past.
    • Take this list with you every time you see a health care provider.
  • Reading medicine labels and following the directions. Don't just rely on your memory - read the medication label every time. Be especially careful when giving medicines to children.
  • Asking questions. If you don't know the answers to these questions, ask your health care provider or pharmacist:
    • Why am I taking this medicine?
    • What are the common side effects?
    • What should I do if I have side effects?
    • When should I stop this medicine?
    • Can I take this medicine with the other medicines and supplements on my list?
    • Do I need to avoid certain foods or alcohol while taking this medicine?

Food and Drug Administration


[Learn More]