2021 ICD-10-CM Code T38.1X2

Poisoning by thyroid hormones and substitutes, intentional self-harm

Version 2021
Replaced Code
Non-Billable Code
Poisoning Intentional

Not Valid for Submission

T38.1X2 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of poisoning by thyroid hormones and substitutes, intentional self-harm. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

The ICD-10-CM code T38.1X2 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like intentional levothyroxine sodium poisoning, intentional liothyronine overdose, intentional liothyronine poisoning, intentional thyroglobulin poisoning, intentional thyroxin overdose , intentional thyroxin poisoning, etc.

ICD-10:T38.1X2
Short Description:Poisoning by thyroid hormones and substitutes, self-harm
Long Description:Poisoning by thyroid hormones and substitutes, intentional self-harm

Code Classification

Specific Coding for Poisoning by thyroid hormones and substitutes, self-harm

Header codes like T38.1X2 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for poisoning by thyroid hormones and substitutes, self-harm:

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2021 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2020. This code was replaced for the FY 2021 (October 1, 2020 - September 30, 2021).


  • K59.03 - Drug induced constipation

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T38.1X2 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. According to ICD-10 coding guidelines it is advised to do not code directly from the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, instead always refer back to the Tabular List when doing the initial coding. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. It is important to use as many codes as necessary to specify all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances. If the same diagnosis code describes the causative agent for more than one adverse reaction, poisoning, toxic effect or underdosing, utilize the code only once.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
CytomelT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
DetrothyronineT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
DextrothyroxinT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
Dextrothyroxine sodiumT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
EuthroidT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
I-thyroxine sodiumT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
LetterT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
LevoidT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
LevothyroxineT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
Levothyroxine
  »sodium
T38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
LiothyronineT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
LiotrixT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
ProloidT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
SynthroidT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
ThyroglobulinT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
Thyroid (hormone)T38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
ThyrolarT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
ThyroxineT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
TiratricolT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
TitroidT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6
TriiodothyronineT38.1X1T38.1X2T38.1X3T38.1X4T38.1X5T38.1X6

Information for Patients


Hormones

Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work slowly, over time, and affect many different processes, including

Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreas. In addition, men produce hormones in their testes and women produce them in their ovaries.

Hormones are powerful. It takes only a tiny amount to cause big changes in cells or even your whole body. That is why too much or too little of a certain hormone can be serious. Laboratory tests can measure the hormone levels in your blood, urine, or saliva. Your health care provider may perform these tests if you have symptoms of a hormone disorder. Home pregnancy tests are similar - they test for pregnancy hormones in your urine.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Poisoning

A poison is any substance that is harmful to your body. You might swallow it, inhale it, inject it, or absorb it through your skin. Any substance can be poisonous if too much is taken. Poisons can include

The effects of poisoning range from short-term illness to brain damage, coma, and death. To prevent poisoning it is important to use and store products exactly as their labels say. Keep dangerous products where children can't get to them. Treatment for poisoning depends on the type of poison. If you suspect someone has been poisoned, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Self-Harm

What is self-harm?

Self-harm, or self-injury, is when a person hurts his or her own body on purpose. The injuries may be minor, but sometimes they can be severe. They may leave permanent scars or cause serious health problems. Some examples are

Self-harm is not a mental disorder. It is a behavior - an unhealthy way to cope with strong feelings. However, some of the people who harm themselves do have a mental disorder.

People who harm themselves are usually not trying to kill themselves. But they are at higher risk of attempting suicide if they do not get help.

Why do people harm themselves?

There are different reasons why people harm themselves. Often, they have trouble coping and dealing with their feelings. They harm themselves to try to

Who is at risk for self-harm?

There are people of all ages who harm themselves, but it usually starts in the teen or early adult years. Self-harm is more common in people who

What are the signs of self-harm?

Signs that someone may be hurting themselves include

How can I help someone who self-harms?

If someone you know is self-harming, it is important not to be judgmental. Let that person know that you want to help. If the person is a child or teenager, ask him or her to talk to a trusted adult. If he or she won't do that, talk to a trusted adult yourself. If the person who is self-harming is an adult, suggest mental health counseling.

What the treatments are for self-harm?

There are no medicines to treat self-harming behaviors. But there are medicines to treat any mental disorders that the person may have, such as anxiety and depression. Treating the mental disorder may weaken the urge to self-harm.

Mental health counseling or therapy can also help by teaching the person

If the problem is severe, the person may need more intensive treatment in a psychiatric hospital or a mental health day program.


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)