ICD-10-CM Code R25.3

Fasciculation

Version 2020 Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx

Valid for Submission

R25.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of fasciculation. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code R25.3 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like benign fasciculation-cramp syndrome, disorders of spinal neurones manifest by hyperactivity, fasciculation of tongue, muscle fasciculation, muscle twitch, o/e - muscular fasciculation, etc

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

ICD-10:R25.3
Short Description:Fasciculation
Long Description:Fasciculation

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code R25.3:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Twitching NOS

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R25.3 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Benign fasciculation-cramp syndrome
  • Disorders of spinal neurones manifest by hyperactivity
  • Fasciculation of tongue
  • Muscle fasciculation
  • Muscle twitch
  • O/E - muscular fasciculation
  • O/E - twitching eyes
  • Twitching eye

Clinical Information

  • AXON FASCICULATION-. process of organizing neighboring axons into a bundle or a fascicle during neurite outgrowth mediated by cell adhesion molecules.
  • FASCICULATION-. involuntary contraction of the muscle fibers innervated by a motor unit. fasciculations may be visualized as a muscle twitch or dimpling under the skin but usually do not generate sufficient force to move a limb. they may represent a benign condition or occur as a manifestation of motor neuron disease or peripheral nervous system diseases. adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed p1294
  • NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES-. a general term encompassing lower motor neuron disease; peripheral nervous system diseases; and certain muscular diseases. manifestations include muscle weakness; fasciculation; muscle atrophy; spasm; myokymia; muscle hypertonia myalgias and muscle hypotonia.

Convert R25.3 to ICD-9

  • 781.0 - Abn involun movement NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving the nervous and musculoskeletal systems (R25-R29)
      • Abnormal involuntary movements (R25)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Movement Disorders

Movement disorders are neurologic conditions that cause problems with movement, such as

  • Increased movement that can be voluntary (intentional) or involuntary (unintended)
  • Decreased or slow voluntary movement

There are many different movement disorders. Some of the more common types include

  • Ataxia, the loss of muscle coordination
  • Dystonia, in which involuntary contractions of your muscles cause twisting and repetitive movements. The movements can be painful.
  • Huntington's disease, an inherited disease that causes nerve cells in certain parts of the brain to waste away. This includes the nerve cells that help to control voluntary movement.
  • Parkinson's disease, which is disorder that slowly gets worse over time. It causes tremors, slowness of movement, and trouble walking.
  • Tourette syndrome, a condition which causes people to make sudden twitches, movements, or sounds (tics)
  • Tremor and essential tremor, which cause involuntary trembling or shaking movements. The movements may be in one or more parts of your body.

Causes of movement disorders include

  • Genetics
  • Infections
  • Medicines
  • Damage to the brain, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves
  • Metabolic disorders
  • Stroke and vascular diseases
  • Toxins

Treatment varies by disorder. Medicines can cure some disorders. Others get better when an underlying disease is treated. Often, however, there is no cure. In that case, the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms and relieve pain.


[Learn More]