2022 ICD-10-CM Code R25.1

Tremor, unspecified

Version 2021
No Valid Principal Dx

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:R25.1
Short Description:Tremor, unspecified
Long Description:Tremor, unspecified

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving the nervous and musculoskeletal systems (R25-R29)
      • Abnormal involuntary movements (R25)

R25.1 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of tremor, unspecified. The code R25.1 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code R25.1 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like aspergillus clavatus tremors, bilateral outstretched hands tremor, chronic tremor, coarse tremor, continuous tremor , dissociative neurological symptom disorder co-occurrent with tremor, etc.

Unspecified diagnosis codes like R25.1 are acceptable when clinical information is unknown or not available about a particular condition. Although a more specific code is preferable, unspecified codes should be used when such codes most accurately reflect what is known about a patient's condition. Specific diagnosis codes should not be used if not supported by the patient's medical record.

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with coding notes and guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code R25.1:


Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R25.1 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Clinical Information

Convert R25.1 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code R25.1 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Tremor

What is a tremor?

A tremor is a rhythmic shaking movement in one or more parts of your body. It is involuntary, meaning that you cannot control it. This shaking happens because of muscle contractions.

A tremor is most often in your hands, but it could also affect your arms, head, vocal cords, trunk, and legs. It may come and go, or it may be constant. Tremor can happen on its own or be caused by another disorder.

What are the types of tremor?

There are several types of tremor, including

What causes tremor?

Generally, tremor is caused by a problem in the deep parts of the brain that control movements. For most types, the cause is unknown. Some types are inherited and run in families. There can also be other causes, such as

Who is at risk for tremor?

Anyone can get tremor, but it is most common in middle-aged and older adults. For certain types, having a family history raises your risk of getting it.

What are the symptoms of tremor?

Symptoms of tremor may include

How is tremor diagnosed?

Your health care provider may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

What are the treatments for tremor?

There is no cure for most forms of tremor, but there are treatments to help manage symptoms. In some cases, the symptoms may be so mild that you do not need treatment.

Finding the right treatment depends on getting the right diagnosis of the cause. Tremor caused by another medical condition may get better or go away when you treat that condition. If your tremor is caused by a certain medicine, stopping that medicine usually makes the tremor go away.

Treatments for tremor where the cause is not found include

If you find that caffeine and other stimulants trigger your tremors, it may be helpful to cut them from your diet.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)