ICD-10-CM Code M30

Polyarteritis nodosa and related conditions

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

M30 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa and related conditions. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:M30
Short Description:Polyarteritis nodosa and related conditions
Long Description:Polyarteritis nodosa and related conditions

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • M30.0 - Polyarteritis nodosa
  • M30.1 - Polyarteritis with lung involvement [Churg-Strauss]
  • M30.2 - Juvenile polyarteritis
  • M30.3 - Mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome [Kawasaki]
  • M30.8 - Other conditions related to polyarteritis nodosa

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code M30:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • microscopic polyarteritis M31.7

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36)
      • Polyarteritis nodosa and related conditions (M30)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Vasculitis

Also called: Angiitis

Vasculitis is an inflammation of the blood vessels. It happens when the body's immune system attacks the blood vessel by mistake. It can happen because of an infection, a medicine, or another disease. The cause is often unknown.

Vasculitis can affect arteries, veins and capillaries. Arteries are vessels that carry blood from the heart to the body's organs. Veins are the vessels that carry blood back to the heart. Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that connect the small arteries and veins.

When a blood vessel becomes inflamed, it can

  • Narrow, making it more difficult for blood to get through
  • Close off completely so that blood can't get through
  • Stretch and weaken so much that it bulges. The bulge is called an aneurysm. If it bursts, it can cause dangerous bleeding inside the body.

Symptoms of vasculitis can vary, but usually include fever, swelling and a general sense of feeling ill. The main goal of treatment is to stop the inflammation. Steroids and other medicines to stop inflammation are often helpful.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Allergic vasculitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Aortic angiography (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cerebral angiography (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Henoch-Schonlein purpura (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Necrotizing vasculitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Polyarteritis nodosa (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Takayasu arteritis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]