2022 ICD-10-CM Code E02

Subclinical iodine-deficiency hypothyroidism

Version 2021

Valid for Submission

ICD-10:E02
Short Description:Subclinical iodine-deficiency hypothyroidism
Long Description:Subclinical iodine-deficiency hypothyroidism

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of thyroid gland (E00-E07)
      • Subclinical iodine-deficiency hypothyroidism (E02)

E02 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of subclinical iodine-deficiency hypothyroidism. The code E02 is valid during the fiscal year 2022 from October 01, 2021 through September 30, 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

The ICD-10-CM code E02 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like iodine hypothyroidism, subclinical disease and/or syndrome, subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical iodine deficiency hypothyroidism.

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E02 are found in the index:

Approximate Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

Convert E02 to ICD-9 Code

The General Equivalency Mapping (GEM) crosswalk indicates an approximate mapping between the ICD-10 code E02 its ICD-9 equivalent. The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 code and the ICD-9 code and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Information for Patients


Hypothyroidism

What is hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid, happens when your thyroid gland doesn't make enough thyroid hormones to meet your body's needs.

Your thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland in the front of your neck. It makes hormones that control the way the body uses energy. These hormones affect nearly every organ in your body and control many of your body's most important functions. For example, they affect your breathing, heart rate, weight, digestion, and moods. Without enough thyroid hormones, many of your body's functions slow down. But there are treatments that can help.

What causes hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism has several causes. They include

Who is at risk for hypothyroidism?

You are at higher risk for hypothyroidism if you

What are the symptoms of hypothyroidism?

The symptoms of hypothyroidism can vary from person to person and may include

Because hypothyroidism develops slowly, many people don't notice symptoms of the disease for months or even years.

What other problems can hypothyroidism cause?

Hypothyroidism can contribute to high cholesterol. In rare cases, untreated hypothyroidism can cause myxedema coma. This is a condition in which your body's functions slow down to the point that it becomes life-threatening.

During pregnancy, hypothyroidism can cause complications, such as premature birth, high blood pressure in pregnancy, and miscarriage. It can also slow the baby's growth and development.

How is hypothyroidism diagnosed?

Your health care provider may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

What are the treatments for hypothyroidism?

The treatment for hypothyroidism is medicine to replace the hormone that your own thyroid can no longer make. About 6 to 8 weeks after you start taking the medicine, you will get a blood test to check your thyroid hormone level. Your health care provider will adjust your dose if needed. Each time your dose is adjusted, you'll have another blood test. Once you find the right dose, you will probably get a blood test in 6 months. After that, you will need the test once a year.

If you take your medicine according to the instructions, you usually should be able to control the hypothyroidism. You should never stop taking your medicine without talking with your health care provider first.

If you have Hashimoto's disease or other types of autoimmune thyroid disorders, you may be sensitive to harmful side effects from iodine. Talk to your health care provider about which foods, supplements, and medicines you need to avoid.

Women need more iodine when they are pregnant because the baby gets iodine from the mother's diet. If you are pregnant, talk with your health care provider about how much iodine you need.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)