ICD-10-CM Code E01.8

Other iodine-deficiency related thyroid disorders and allied conditions

Version 2020 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

E01.8 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other iodine-deficiency related thyroid disorders and allied conditions. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code E01.8 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like iodine deficiency syndrome or iodine hypothyroidism.

ICD-10:E01.8
Short Description:Oth iodine-deficiency related thyroid disord and allied cond
Long Description:Other iodine-deficiency related thyroid disorders and allied conditions

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code E01.8:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Acquired iodine-deficiency hypothyroidism NOS

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code E01.8 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Iodine deficiency syndrome
  • Iodine hypothyroidism

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code E01.8 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2020.

  • 643 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 644 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 645 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert E01.8 to ICD-9

  • 244.8 - Acquired hypothyroid NEC (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of thyroid gland (E00-E07)
      • Iodine-deficiency related thyroid disorders and allied cond (E01)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Hypothyroidism

Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, just above your collarbone. It is one of your endocrine glands, which make hormones. Thyroid hormones control the rate of many activities in your body. These include how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. All of these activities are your body's metabolism. If your thyroid gland is not active enough, it does not make enough thyroid hormone to meet your body's needs. This condition is hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism is more common in women, people with other thyroid problems, and those over 60 years old. Hashimoto's disease, an autoimmune disorder, is the most common cause. Other causes include thyroid nodules, thyroiditis, congenital hypothyroidism, surgical removal of part or all of the thyroid, radiation treatment of the thyroid, and some medicines.

The symptoms can vary from person to person. They may include

  • Fatigue
  • Weight gain
  • A puffy face
  • Cold intolerance
  • Joint and muscle pain
  • Constipation
  • Dry skin
  • Dry, thinning hair
  • Decreased sweating
  • Heavy or irregular menstrual periods and fertility problems
  • Depression
  • Slowed heart rate

To diagnose hypothyroidism, your doctor will do a physical exam, look at your symptoms, and do thyroid tests. Treatment is with synthetic thyroid hormone, taken every day.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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