2022 ICD-10-CM Code D39

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organs

Version 2021

Not Valid for Submission

ICD-10:D39
Short Description:Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organs
Long Description:Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organs

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Neoplasms of uncertain behavior, polycythemia vera and myelodysplastic syndromes (D37-D48)
      • Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organs (D39)

D39 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organs. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2022 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. Category or Header define the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th characters.

Specific Coding for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organs

Non-specific codes like D39 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity. Consider using any of the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity when coding for neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organs:

  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D39.0 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of uterus
  • NON-BILLABLE CODE - D39.1 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of ovary
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D39.10 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of unspecified ovary
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D39.11 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of right ovary
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D39.12 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of left ovary
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D39.2 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of placenta
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D39.8 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of other specified female genital organs
  • BILLABLE CODE - Use D39.9 for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of female genital organ, unspecified

Information for Patients


Ovarian Disorders

The ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. Women have two ovaries, one on each side of the uterus. Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond.

The ovaries produce and store a woman's eggs. During ovulation, an ovary releases an egg. If that egg is fertilized by a sperm, a pregnancy can occur. Ovaries also make the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. When a woman goes through menopause, her ovaries stop making those hormones and releasing eggs.

Problems with the ovaries include


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Uterine Diseases

The uterus, or womb, is the place where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The first sign of a problem with the uterus may be bleeding between periods or after sex. Causes can include hormones, thyroid problems, fibroids, polyps, cancer, infection, or pregnancy.

Treatment depends on the cause. Sometimes birth control pills treat hormonal imbalances. If a thyroid problem is the cause, treating it may also stop the bleeding. If you have cancer or hyperplasia, an overgrowth of normal cells in the uterus, you may need surgery.

With two other uterine problems, tissue that normally lines the uterus grows where it is not supposed to. In endometriosis, it grows outside the uterus. In adenomyosis, it grows in the uterus's outside walls. Pain medicine may help. Other treatments include hormones and surgery.


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Vaginal Diseases

Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have symptoms such as

One common problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. Other problems that affect the vagina include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems depends on the cause.


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Code History

  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016 (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)