ICD-10-CM Code C92.9

Myeloid leukemia, unspecified

Version 2021 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

C92.9 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of myeloid leukemia, unspecified. The code is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:C92.9
Short Description:Myeloid leukemia, unspecified
Long Description:Myeloid leukemia, unspecified

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • C92.90 - ... not having achieved remission
  • C92.91 - Myeloid leukemia, unspecified in remission
  • C92.92 - Myeloid leukemia, unspecified in relapse

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code C92.9 are found in the index:


Clinical Information

  • LEUKEMIA ERYTHROBLASTIC ACUTE-. a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neoplastic proliferation of erythroblastic and myeloblastic elements with atypical erythroblasts and myeloblasts in the peripheral blood.
  • LEUKEMIA MEGAKARYOBLASTIC ACUTE-. an acute myeloid leukemia in which 20 30% of the bone marrow or peripheral blood cells are of megakaryocyte lineage. myelofibrosis or increased bone marrow reticulin is common.
  • LEUKEMIA MONOCYTIC ACUTE-. an acute myeloid leukemia in which 80% or more of the leukemic cells are of monocytic lineage including monoblasts promonocytes and monocytes.
  • LEUKEMIA MYELOID-. form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow and other sites.
  • LEUKEMIA MYELOGENOUS CHRONIC BCR ABL POSITIVE-. clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in pluripotent stem cells. it starts in myeloid cells of the bone marrow invades the blood and then other organs. the condition progresses from a stable more indolent chronic phase leukemia myeloid chronic phase lasting up to 7 years to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase leukemia myeloid accelerated phase and blast crisis.
  • LEUKEMIA MYELOID ACCELERATED PHASE-. the phase of chronic myeloid leukemia following the chronic phase leukemia myeloid chronic phase where there are increased systemic symptoms worsening cytopenias and refractory leukocytosis.
  • LEUKEMIA MYELOID CHRONIC PHASE-. the initial phase of chronic myeloid leukemia consisting of an relatively indolent period lasting from 4 to 7 years. patients range from asymptomatic to those exhibiting anemia; splenomegaly; and increased cell turnover. there are 5% or fewer blast cells in the blood and bone marrow in this phase.
  • LEUKEMIA MYELOID ACUTE-. clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow blood and other tissue. myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce neutrophils; basophils; eosinophils; and monocytes.
  • LEUKEMIA PROMYELOCYTIC ACUTE-. an acute myeloid leukemia in which abnormal promyelocytes predominate. it is frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation.
  • LEUKEMIA MYELOMONOCYTIC ACUTE-. a pediatric acute myeloid leukemia involving both myeloid and monocytoid precursors. at least 20% of non erythroid cells are of monocytic origin.
  • LEUKEMIA MYELOID CHRONIC ATYPICAL BCR ABL NEGATIVE-. a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disorder characterized by myelodysplasia associated with bone marrow and peripheral blood patterns similar to chronic myeloid leukemia but cytogenetically lacking a philadelphia chromosome or bcr/abl fusion gene genes abl.

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, hematopoietic and related tissue (C81-C96)
      • Myeloid leukemia (C92)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Also called: AML, ANLL, Acute myelogenous leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there are too many of a specific type of white blood cell called a myeloblast.

AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. This type of cancer usually gets worse quickly if it is not treated. Possible risk factors include smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation.

Symptoms of AML include:

  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath
  • Easy bruising or bleeding
  • Bleeding under the skin
  • Weakness or feeling tired
  • Weight loss or loss of appetite

Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow diagnose AML. Treatments include chemotherapy, other drugs, radiation therapy, stem cell transplants, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Once the leukemia is in remission, you need additional treatment to make sure that it does not come back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Acute myeloid leukemia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • After chemotherapy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Also called: CML, Chronic granulocytic leukemia, Chronic myelogenous leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there are too many granulocytes, a type of white blood cell.

Most people with CML have a gene mutation (change) called the Philadelphia chromosome.

Sometimes CML does not cause any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Night sweats
  • Fever
  • Pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs on the left side

Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow diagnose CML. Treatments include chemotherapy, stem cell transplants, infusion of donated white blood cells following stem cell transplants, surgery to remove the spleen, and biologic and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]