ICD-10-CM Code C92.90

Myeloid leukemia, unspecified, not having achieved remission

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

C92.90 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of myeloid leukemia, unspecified, not having achieved remission. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code C92.90 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like acute myeloid leukemia due to recurrent genetic abnormality, complete trisomy 21 syndrome, leukemic infiltration of skin in acute myeloid leukemia, leukemic infiltration of skin in myeloid leukemia, myeloid leukemia, myeloid leukemia co-occurrent with down syndrome, etc

ICD-10:C92.90
Short Description:Myeloid leukemia, unspecified, not having achieved remission
Long Description:Myeloid leukemia, unspecified, not having achieved remission

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code C92.90:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Myeloid leukemia, unspecified with failed remission
  • Myeloid leukemia, unspecified NOS

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acute myeloid leukemia due to recurrent genetic abnormality
  • Complete trisomy 21 syndrome
  • Leukemic infiltration of skin in acute myeloid leukemia
  • Leukemic infiltration of skin in myeloid leukemia
  • Myeloid leukemia
  • Myeloid leukemia co-occurrent with Down syndrome
  • Therapy related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome
  • Therapy related acute myeloid leukemia due to and following administration of antineoplastic agent

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code C92.90 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 820 - LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURES WITH MCC
  • 821 - LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURES WITH CC
  • 822 - LYMPHOMA AND LEUKEMIA WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert C92.90 to ICD-9

  • 205.90 - Uns my leu wo ach rmsn

Code Classification

  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, hematopoietic and related tissue (C81-C96)
      • Myeloid leukemia (C92)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Also called: AML, ANLL, Acute myelogenous leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there are too many of a specific type of white blood cell called a myeloblast.

AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. This type of cancer usually gets worse quickly if it is not treated. Possible risk factors include smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation.

Symptoms of AML include:

  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath
  • Easy bruising or bleeding
  • Bleeding under the skin
  • Weakness or feeling tired
  • Weight loss or loss of appetite

Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow diagnose AML. Treatments include chemotherapy, other drugs, radiation therapy, stem cell transplants, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Once the leukemia is in remission, you need additional treatment to make sure that it does not come back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Acute myeloid leukemia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • After chemotherapy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Also called: CML, Chronic granulocytic leukemia, Chronic myelogenous leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there are too many granulocytes, a type of white blood cell.

Most people with CML have a gene mutation (change) called the Philadelphia chromosome.

Sometimes CML does not cause any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Night sweats
  • Fever
  • Pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs on the left side

Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow diagnose CML. Treatments include chemotherapy, stem cell transplants, infusion of donated white blood cells following stem cell transplants, surgery to remove the spleen, and biologic and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]