ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E74.09

Other glycogen storage disease

Diagnosis Code E74.09

ICD-10: E74.09
Short Description: Other glycogen storage disease
Long Description: Other glycogen storage disease
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E74.09

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Other disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (E74)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Cardiac glycogen phosphorylase kinase deficiency
  • Danon disease
  • Deficiency of alpha-dextrin endo-1,6-alpha-glucosidase
  • Deficiency of alpha-galactosidase
  • Glycogen phosphorylase kinase deficiency
  • Glycogen phosphorylase kinase deficiency, autosomal recessive
  • Glycogen phosphorylase kinase deficiency, X-linked
  • Glycogen storage disease type VIII
  • Glycogen storage disease type X
  • Glycogen storage disease, hepatic form
  • Glycogen storage disease, muscular form
  • Glycogen storage disease, type IV
  • Glycogen storage disease, type IX
  • Glycogen storage disease, type VI
  • Glycogen storage disease, type VII
  • Glycogen synthase deficiency
  • Glycogenosis with glucoaminophosphaturia
  • Hepatic and muscle glycogen phosphorylase kinase deficiency
  • Hepatic glycogen phosphorylase kinase deficiency
  • Phosphate transport defect

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code E74.09 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process.

Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally your enzymes break carbohydrates down into glucose (a type of sugar). If you have one of these disorders, you may not have enough enzymes to break down the carbohydrates. Or the enzymes may not work properly. This causes a harmful amount of sugar to build up in your body. That can lead to health problems, some of which can be serious. Some of the disorders are fatal.

These disorders are inherited. Newborn babies get screened for many of them, using blood tests. If there is a family history of one of these disorders, parents can get genetic testing to see whether they carry the gene. Other genetic tests can tell whether the fetus has the disorder or carries the gene for the disorder.

Treatments may include special diets, supplements, and medicines. Some babies may also need additional treatments, if there are complications. For some disorders, there is no cure, but treatments may help with symptoms.

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Glycogen storage disease type 0 Glycogen storage disease type 0 (also known as GSD 0) is a condition caused by the body's inability to form a complex sugar called glycogen, which is a major source of stored energy in the body. GSD 0 has two types: in muscle GSD 0, glycogen formation in the muscles is impaired, and in liver GSD 0, glycogen formation in the liver is impaired.The signs and symptoms of muscle GSD 0 typically begin in early childhood. Affected individuals often experience muscle pain and weakness or episodes of fainting (syncope) following moderate physical activity, such as walking up stairs. The loss of consciousness that occurs with fainting typically lasts up to several hours. Some individuals with muscle GSD 0 have a disruption of the heart's normal rhythm (arrhythmia) known as long QT syndrome. In all affected individuals, muscle GSD 0 impairs the heart's ability to effectively pump blood and increases the risk of cardiac arrest and sudden death, particularly after physical activity. Sudden death from cardiac arrest can occur in childhood or adolescence in people with muscle GSD 0.Individuals with liver GSD 0 usually show signs and symptoms of the disorder in infancy. People with this disorder develop low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) after going long periods of time without food (fasting). Signs of hypoglycemia become apparent when affected infants begin sleeping through the night and stop late-night feedings; these infants exhibit extreme tiredness (lethargy), pale skin (pallor), and nausea. During episodes of fasting, ketone levels in the blood may increase (ketosis). Ketones are molecules produced during the breakdown of fats, which occurs when stored sugars (such as glycogen) are unavailable. These short-term signs and symptoms of liver GSD 0 often improve when food is eaten and sugar levels in the body return to normal. The features of liver GSD 0 vary; they can be mild and go unnoticed for years, or they can include developmental delay and growth failure.
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Glycogen storage disease type IV Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an inherited disorder caused by the buildup of a complex sugar called glycogen in the body's cells. The accumulated glycogen is structurally abnormal and impairs the function of certain organs and tissues, especially the liver and muscles. There are five types of GSD IV, which are distinguished by their severity, signs, and symptoms.The fatal perinatal neuromuscular type is the most severe form of GSD IV, with signs developing before birth. Excess fluid may build up around the fetus (polyhydramnios) and in the fetus' body. Affected fetuses have a condition called fetal akinesia deformation sequence, which causes a decrease in fetal movement and can lead to joint stiffness (arthrogryposis) after birth. Infants with the fatal perinatal neuromuscular type of GSD IV have very low muscle tone (severe hypotonia) and muscle wasting (atrophy). These infants usually do not survive past the newborn period due to weakened heart and breathing muscles.The congenital muscular type of GSD IV is usually not evident before birth but develops in early infancy. Affected infants have severe hypotonia, which affects the muscles needed for breathing. These babies often have dilated cardiomyopathy, which enlarges and weakens the heart (cardiac) muscle, preventing the heart from pumping blood efficiently. Infants with the congenital muscular type of GSD IV typically survive only a few months.The progressive hepatic type is the most common form of GSD IV. Within the first months of life, affected infants have difficulty gaining weight and growing at the expected rate (failure to thrive) and develop an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly). Children with this type develop a form of liver disease called cirrhosis that often is irreversible. High blood pressure in the vein that supplies blood to the liver (portal hypertension) and an abnormal buildup of fluid in the abdominal cavity (ascites) can also occur. By age 1 or 2, affected children develop hypotonia. Children with the progressive hepatic type of GSD IV often die of liver failure in early childhood.The non-progressive hepatic type of GSD IV has many of the same features as the progressive hepatic type, but the liver disease is not as severe. In the non-progressive hepatic type, hepatomegaly and liver disease are usually evident in early childhood, but affected individuals typically do not develop cirrhosis. People with this type of the disorder can also have hypotonia and muscle weakness (myopathy). Most individuals with this type survive into adulthood, although life expectancy varies depending on the severity of the signs and symptoms.The childhood neuromuscular type of GSD IV develops in late childhood and is characterized by myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. The severity of this type of GSD IV varies greatly; some people have only mild muscle weakness while others have severe cardiomyopathy and die in early adulthood.
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Glycogen storage disease type VI Glycogen storage disease type VI (also known as GSDVI or Hers disease) is an inherited disorder caused by an inability to break down a complex sugar called glycogen in liver cells. A lack of glycogen breakdown interferes with the normal function of the liver.The signs and symptoms of GSDVI typically begin in infancy to early childhood. The first sign is usually an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly). Affected individuals may also have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) or a buildup of lactic acid in the body (lactic acidosis) during prolonged periods without food (fasting).The signs and symptoms of GSDVI tend to improve with age; most adults with this condition do not have any related health problems.
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