ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E70.331

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

Diagnosis Code E70.331

ICD-10: E70.331
Short Description: Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome
Long Description: Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E70.331

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Disorders of aromatic amino-acid metabolism (E70)

Information for Patients

Skin Pigmentation Disorders

Also called: Hyperpigmentation, Hypopigmentation

Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of skin. Others affect your entire body.

If your body makes too much melanin, your skin gets darker. Pregnancy, Addison's disease, and sun exposure all can make your skin darker. If your body makes too little melanin, your skin gets lighter. Vitiligo is a condition that causes patches of light skin. Albinism is a genetic condition affecting a person's skin. A person with albinism may have no color, lighter than normal skin color, or patchy missing skin color. Infections, blisters and burns can also cause lighter skin.

  • Acanthosis nigricans
  • Albinism
  • Incontinentia pigmenti
  • Incontinentia pigmenti achromians
  • Liver spots
  • Melasma
  • Skin - abnormally dark or light
  • Skin color - patchy
  • Urticaria pigmentosa

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Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a disorder characterized by a condition called oculocutaneous albinism, which causes abnormally light coloring (pigmentation) of the skin, hair, and eyes. Affected individuals typically have fair skin and white or light-colored hair. People with this disorder have a higher than average risk of skin damage and skin cancers caused by long-term sun exposure. Oculocutaneous albinism reduces pigmentation of the colored part of the eye (iris) and the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retina). Reduced vision, rapid and involuntary eye movements (nystagmus), and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia) are also common in oculocutaneous albinism. In Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, these vision problems usually remain stable after early childhood.People with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome also have problems with blood clotting (coagulation) that lead to easy bruising and prolonged bleeding.Some individuals with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome develop breathing problems due to a lung disease called pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scar tissue to form in the lungs. The symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis usually appear during an individual's early thirties and rapidly worsen. Individuals with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome who develop pulmonary fibrosis often do not live for more than a decade after they begin to experience breathing problems.Other, less common features of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome include inflammation of the large intestine (granulomatous colitis) and kidney failure.There are nine different types of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, which can be distinguished by their signs and symptoms and underlying genetic cause. Types 1 and 4 are the most severe forms of the disorder. Types 1, 2, and 4 are the only types associated with pulmonary fibrosis. Individuals with type 3, 5, or 6 have the mildest symptoms. Little is known about the signs, symptoms, and severity of types 7, 8, and 9.
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