ICD-10 Code T37.8X2

Poisoning by other specified systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics, intentional self-harm

Version 2019 Replaced Code Non-Billable Code Poisoning Intentional

Not Valid for Submission

T37.8X2 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of poisoning by other specified systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics, intentional self-harm. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: T37.8X2
Short Description:Poisoning by oth systemic anti-infect/parasit, self-harm
Long Description:Poisoning by other specified systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics, intentional self-harm

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • T37.8X2A - Poisoning by other specified systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics, intentional self-harm, initial encounter
  • T37.8X2D - Poisoning by other specified systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics, intentional self-harm, subsequent encounter
  • T37.8X2S - Poisoning by other specified systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics, intentional self-harm, sequela

Replaced Code

This code was replaced in the 2020 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2019. This code was replaced for the FY 2020 (October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020).

  • K59.03 - Drug induced constipation

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Other systemic anti-infectives and antiparasitics (T37)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Medical Professionals

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • 4-quinolones poisoning
  • Antimony compound overdose
  • Flucytosine overdose
  • Hydroxyquinoline overdose
  • Hydroxyquinoline poisoning
  • Intentional 4-quinolones poisoning
  • Intentional antimony compound overdose
  • Intentional diiodohydroxyquinoline poisoning
  • Intentional flucytosine overdose
  • Intentional flucytosine poisoning
  • Intentional hydroxyquinoline overdose
  • Intentional hydroxyquinoline poisoning
  • Intentional nitrofuran derivative overdose
  • Intentional nitrofuran derivative poisoning
  • Intentional trimethoprim overdose
  • Intentional trimethoprim poisoning
  • Nitrofuran derivative overdose
  • Poisoning by diiodohydroxyquin
  • Poisoning by flucytosine
  • Poisoning by nitrofuran derivatives
  • Poisoning by quinoline AND/OR hydroxyquinoline derivative
  • Poisoning by quinoline AND/OR hydroxyquinoline derivative
  • Trimethoprim overdose
  • Trimethoprim poisoning

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T37.8X2 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. Use as many codes as necessary to describe all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
AkritoinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Arsphenamine (silver)T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
BismarsenT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
BithionolT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Bithionol
  »anthelminthic
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
BroxyquinolineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
ChiniofonT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
CinoxacinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
ClioquinolT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
CroconazoleT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
DichlorhydroxyquinolineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
DiiodohydroxyquinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Diiodohydroxyquin
  »topical
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
DiiodohydroxyquinolineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
DiodoquinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
FloraquinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
FluconazoleT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
FlucytosineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
FlumequineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
FlunidazoleT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
FluorocytosineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
FurazolidoneT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Hexamine (mandelate)T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
HexetidineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
HydroxychloroquineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Hydroxyquinoline (derivatives) NECT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
IodobismitolT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
IodochlorhydroxyquinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Iodochlorhydroxyquin
  »topical
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
IodochlorhydroxyquinolineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
IodoquinolT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
ItraconazoleT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Mandelic acidT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
MapharsenT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
MeglumineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Meglumine
  »antimoniate
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Meglumine
  »diatrizoate
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Meglumine
  »iodipamide
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Meglumine
  »iotroxate
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Methenamine (mandelate)T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
MetronidazoleT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Nalidixic acidT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
NeoarsphenamineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
NeosalvarsanT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
NeosilversalvarsanT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
NifuratelT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
NifurtoinolT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
NitrofurantoinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
NitroxolineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Oxolinic acidT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Oxyquinoline (derivatives)T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
PefloxacinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Pipemidic acidT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Piromidic acidT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
QuiniobineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Quinoline (derivatives) NECT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
RosoxacinT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Salvarsan 606 (neosilver) (silver)T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
StovarsalT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
SulfarsphenamineT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Tartar emeticT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Tartrated antimony (anti-infective)T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
ThiobismolT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
ThiocarbarsoneT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
TrimethoprimT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Trimethoprim
  »with sulfamethoxazole
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Urinary anti-infectiveT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
VioformT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
Vioform
  »topical
T37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6
XibornolT37.8X1T37.8X2T37.8X3T37.8X4T37.8X5T37.8X6

Information for Patients


Poisoning

A poison is any substance that is harmful to your body. You might swallow it, inhale it, inject it, or absorb it through your skin. Any substance can be poisonous if too much is taken. Poisons can include

  • Prescription or over-the-counter medicines taken in doses that are too high
  • Overdoses of illegal drugs
  • Carbon monoxide from gas appliances
  • Household products, such as laundry powder or furniture polish
  • Pesticides
  • Indoor or outdoor plants
  • Metals such as lead and mercury

The effects of poisoning range from short-term illness to brain damage, coma, and death. To prevent poisoning it is important to use and store products exactly as their labels say. Keep dangerous products where children can't get to them. Treatment for poisoning depends on the type of poison. If you suspect someone has been poisoned, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away.


[Learn More]

Self-Harm

What is self-harm?

Self-harm, or self-injury, is when a person hurts his or her own body on purpose. The injuries may be minor, but sometimes they can be severe. They may leave permanent scars or cause serious health problems. Some examples are

  • Cutting yourself (such as using a razor blade, knife, or other sharp object to cut your skin)
  • Punching yourself or punching things (like a wall)
  • Burning yourself with cigarettes, matches, or candles
  • Pulling out your hair
  • Poking objects through body openings
  • Breaking your bones or bruising yourself

Self-harm is not a mental disorder. It is a behavior - an unhealthy way to cope with strong feelings. However, some of the people who harm themselves do have a mental disorder.

People who harm themselves are usually not trying to kill themselves. But they are at higher risk of attempting suicide if they do not get help.

Why do people harm themselves?

There are different reasons why people harm themselves. Often, they have trouble coping and dealing with their feelings. They harm themselves to try to

  • Make themselves feel something, when they feel empty or numb inside
  • Block upsetting memories
  • Show that they need help
  • Release strong feelings that overwhelm them, such as anger, loneliness, or hopelessness
  • Punish themselves
  • Feel a sense of control

Who is at risk for self-harm?

There are people of all ages who harm themselves, but it usually starts in the teen or early adult years. Self-harm is more common in people who

  • Were abused or went through a trauma as children
  • Have mental disorders, such as
    • Depression
    • Eating disorders
    • Post-traumatic stress disorder
    • Certain personality disorders
  • Abuse drugs or alcohol
  • Have friends who self-harm
  • Have low self-esteem

What are the signs of self-harm?

Signs that someone may be hurting themselves include

  • Having frequent cuts, bruises, or scars
  • Wearing long sleeves or pants even in hot weather
  • Making excuses about injuries
  • Having sharp objects around for no clear reason

How can I help someone who self-harms?

If someone you know is self-harming, it is important not to be judgmental. Let that person know that you want to help. If the person is a child or teenager, ask him or her to talk to a trusted adult. If he or she won't do that, talk to a trusted adult yourself. If the person who is self-harming is an adult, suggest mental health counseling.

What the treatments are for self-harm?

There are no medicines to treat self-harming behaviors. But there are medicines to treat any mental disorders that the person may have, such as anxiety and depression. Treating the mental disorder may weaken the urge to self-harm.

Mental health counseling or therapy can also help by teaching the person

  • Problem-solving skills
  • New ways to cope with strong emotions
  • Better relationship skills
  • Ways to strengthen self-esteem

If the problem is severe, the person may need more intensive treatment in a psychiatric hospital or a mental health day program.


[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.