ICD-10-CM Code Q64.1

Exstrophy of urinary bladder

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

Q64.1 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of exstrophy of urinary bladder. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:Q64.1
Short Description:Exstrophy of urinary bladder
Long Description:Exstrophy of urinary bladder

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • Q64.10 - ... unspecified
  • Q64.11 - Supravesical fissure of urinary bladder
  • Q64.12 - Cloacal exstrophy of urinary bladder
  • Q64.19 - Other exstrophy of urinary bladder

Code Classification

  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q99)
    • Congenital malformations of the urinary system (Q60-Q64)
      • Other congenital malformations of urinary system (Q64)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Bladder Diseases

The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Many conditions can affect your bladder. Some common ones are

  • Cystitis - inflammation of the bladder, often from an infection
  • Urinary incontinence - loss of bladder control
  • Overactive bladder - a condition in which the bladder squeezes urine out at the wrong time
  • Interstitial cystitis - a chronic problem that causes bladder pain and frequent, urgent urination
  • Bladder cancer

Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x-rays, and an examination of the bladder wall with a scope called a cystoscope. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. It may include medicines and, in severe cases, surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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