C94.82 - Other specified leukemias, in relapse

Version 2023
ICD-10:C94.82
Short Description:Other specified leukemias, in relapse
Long Description:Other specified leukemias, in relapse
Status: Valid for Submission
Version:ICD-10-CM 2023
Code Classification:
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, hematopoietic and related tissue (C81-C96)
      • Other leukemias of specified cell type (C94)

C94.82 is a billable ICD-10 code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other specified leukemias, in relapse. The code is valid during the fiscal year 2023 from October 01, 2022 through September 30, 2023 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Convert to ICD-9 Code

Source ICD-10 CodeTarget ICD-9 Code
C94.82207.82 - Oth spf leuk in relapse
Approximate Flag - The approximate mapping means there is not an exact match between the ICD-10 and ICD-9 codes and the mapped code is not a precise representation of the original code.

Patient Education


Leukemia

What is leukemia?

Leukemia is a term for cancers of the blood cells. Leukemia starts in blood-forming tissues such as the bone marrow. Your bone marrow makes the cells which will develop into white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Each type of cell has a different job:

When you have leukemia, your bone marrow makes large numbers of abnormal cells. This problem most often happens with white blood cells. These abnormal cells build up in your bone marrow and blood. They crowd out the healthy blood cells and make it hard for your cells and blood to do their work.

What are the types of leukemia?

There are different types of leukemia. Which type of leukemia you have depends on the type of blood cell that becomes cancer and whether it grows quickly or slowly.

The type of blood cell could be:

The different types can grow quickly or slowly:

The main types of leukemia are:

What causes leukemia?

Leukemia happens when there are changes in the genetic material (DNA) in bone marrow cells. The cause of these genetic changes is unknown.

Who is at risk for leukemia?

For the specific types, there are different factors which can raise your risk of getting that type. Overall, your risk of leukemia goes up as you age. It is most common over age 60.

What are the symptoms of leukemia?

Some of the symptoms of leukemia may include:

Other leukemia symptoms can be different from type to type. Chromic leukemia may not cause symptoms at first.

How is leukemia diagnosed?

Your health care provider may use many tools to diagnose leukemia:

Once the provider makes a diagnosis, there may be additional tests to see whether the cancer has spread. These include imaging tests and a lumbar puncture, which is a procedure to collect and test cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

What are the treatments for leukemia?

The treatments for leukemia depend on which type you have, how severe the leukemia is, your age, your overall health, and other factors. Some possible treatments might include:

NIH: National Cancer Institute


[Learn More in MedlinePlus]

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