ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T67.1XXS

Heat syncope, sequela

Diagnosis Code T67.1XXS

ICD-10: T67.1XXS
Short Description: Heat syncope, sequela
Long Description: Heat syncope, sequela
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T67.1XXS

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Other and unspecified effects of external causes (T66-T78)
      • Effects of heat and light (T67)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code T67.1XXS is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code T67.1XXS is exempt from POA reporting.

Information for Patients


Also called: Syncope

Fainting is a temporary loss of consciousness. If you're about to faint, you'll feel dizzy, lightheaded, or nauseous. Your field of vision may "white out" or "black out." Your skin may be cold and clammy. You lose muscle control at the same time, and may fall down.

Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, causing a decrease in blood flow to your brain. It is more common in older people. Some causes of fainting include

  • Heat or dehydration
  • Emotional distress
  • Standing up too quickly
  • Certain medicines
  • Drop in blood sugar
  • Heart problems

When someone faints, make sure that the airway is clear and check for breathing. The person should stay lying down for 10-15 minutes. Most people recover completely. Fainting is usually nothing to worry about, but it can sometimes be a sign of a serious problem. If you faint, it's important to see your health care provider and find out why it happened.

  • Fainting

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Heat Illness

Also called: Heat exhaustion, Sunstroke

Your body normally cools itself by sweating. During hot weather, especially with high humidity, sweating just isn't enough. Your body temperature can rise to dangerous levels and you can develop a heat illness. Most heat illnesses occur from staying out in the heat too long. Exercising too much for your age and physical condition are also factors. Older adults, young children and those who are sick or overweight are most at risk. Drinking fluids to prevent dehydration, replenishing salt and minerals, and limiting time in the heat can help.

Heat-related illnesses include

  • Heatstroke - a life-threatening illness in which body temperature may rise above 106° F in minutes; symptoms include dry skin, rapid, strong pulse and dizziness
  • Heat exhaustion - an illness that can precede heatstroke; symptoms include heavy sweating, rapid breathing and a fast, weak pulse
  • Heat cramps - muscle pains or spasms that happen during heavy exercise
  • Heat rash - skin irritation from excessive sweating

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Heat emergencies
  • How to avoid overheating during exercise
  • Protecting Workers from Heat Stress (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)
  • Protecting Yourself from Heat Stress (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

[Read More]
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