ICD-10 Diagnosis Code M32.15

Tubulo-interstitial neuropath in sys lupus erythematosus

Diagnosis Code M32.15

ICD-10: M32.15
Short Description: Tubulo-interstitial neuropath in sys lupus erythematosus
Long Description: Tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code M32.15

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
    • Systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36)
      • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (M32)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code M32.15 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Renal tubulo-interstitial disorder in systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Renal tubulo-interstitial disorders in systemic connective tissue disorders

Information for Patients

Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • ACE inhibitors
  • Acute nephritic syndrome
  • Analgesic nephropathy
  • Atheroembolic renal disease
  • Bartter syndrome
  • Bilateral hydronephrosis
  • Congenital nephrotic syndrome
  • Distal renal tubular acidosis
  • Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Goodpasture syndrome
  • IgA nephropathy
  • Injury - kidney and ureter
  • Interstitial nephritis
  • Kidney removal
  • Kidney removal - discharge
  • Medicines and Kidney Disease - NIH (National Kidney Disease Education Program)
  • Membranoproliferative GN I
  • Membranous nephropathy
  • Minimal change disease
  • Nephrocalcinosis
  • Nephrotic syndrome
  • Obstructive uropathy
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis
  • Reflux nephropathy
  • Renal papillary necrosis
  • Renal perfusion scintiscan
  • Renal vein thrombosis
  • Unilateral hydronephrosis

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Also called: Discoid lupus, SLE, Subacute cutaneous lupus, Systemic lupus erythematosus

What is lupus?

Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can damage many parts of the body, including the joints, skin, kidneys, heart, lungs, blood vessels, and brain.

There are several kinds of lupus

  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common type. It can be mild or severe, and can affect many parts of the body.
  • Discoid lupus causes a red rash that doesn't go away
  • Subacute cutaneous lupus causes sores after being out in the sun
  • Drug-induced lupus is caused by certain medicines. It usually goes away when you stop taking the medicine.
  • Neonatal lupus, which is rare, affects newborns. It is probably caused by certain antibodies from the mother.

Who gets lupus?

Anyone can get lupus, but women are most at risk. Lupus is two to three times more common in African American women than in Caucasian women. It's also more common in Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. African American and Hispanic women are more likely to have severe forms of lupus.

What causes lupus?

The cause of lupus is not known.

What are the symptoms of lupus?

Lupus can have many symptoms, and they differ from person to person. Some of the more common ones are

  • Pain or swelling in joints
  • Muscle pain
  • Fever with no known cause
  • Red rashes, most often on the face (also called the "butterfly rash")
  • Chest pain when taking a deep breath
  • Hair loss
  • Pale or purple fingers or toes
  • Sensitivity to the sun
  • Swelling in legs or around eyes
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Swollen glands
  • Feeling very tired

Symptoms may come and go. When you are having symptoms, it is called a flare. Flares can range from mild to severe. New symptoms may appear at any time.

How do I know if I have lupus?

There is no single test to diagnose lupus, and it's often mistaken for other diseases. So it may take months or years for a doctor to diagnose it. Your doctor may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

  • Medical history
  • Complete exam
  • Blood tests
  • Skin biopsy (looking at skin samples under a microscope)
  • Kidney biopsy (looking at tissue from your kidney under a microscope)

What are the treatments for lupus?

There is no cure for lupus, but medicines and lifestyle changes can help control it.

People with lupus often need to see different doctors. You will have a primary care doctor and a rheumatologist (a doctor who specializes in the diseases of joints and muscles). Which other specialists you see depends on how lupus affects your body. For example, if lupus damages your heart or blood vessels, you would see a cardiologist.

Your primary care doctor should coordinate care between your different health care providers and treat other problems as they come up. Your doctor will develop a treatment plan to fit your needs. You and your doctor should review the plan often to be sure it is working. You should report new symptoms to your doctor right away so that your treatment plan can be changed if needed.

The goals of the treatment plan are to

  • Prevent flares
  • Treat flares when they occur
  • Reduce organ damage and other problems

Treatments may include drugs to

  • Reduce swelling and pain
  • Prevent or reduce flares
  • Help the immune system
  • Reduce or prevent damage to joints
  • Balance the hormones

Besides taking medicines for lupus, you may need to take medicines for problems that are related to lupus such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or infection.

Alternative treatments are those that are not part of standard treatment. At this time, no research shows that alternative medicine can treat lupus. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help you cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. You should talk to your doctor before trying any alternative treatments.

How can I cope with lupus?

It is important to take an active role in your treatment. It helps to learn more about lupus - being able to spot the warning signs of a flare can help you prevent the flare or make the symptoms less severe.

It is also important to find ways to cope with the stress of having lupus. Exercising and finding ways to relax may make it easier for you to cope. A good support system can also help.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Antinuclear antibody panel
  • Collagen vascular disease
  • Drug-induced lupus erythematosus
  • Lupus nephritis
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

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