ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E78.0

Pure hypercholesterolemia

Diagnosis Code E78.0

ICD-10: E78.0
Short Description: Pure hypercholesterolemia
Long Description: Pure hypercholesterolemia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E78.0

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism and other lipidemias (E78)

Information for Medical Professionals

  • Cholesterol-related arthritis and periarthritis
  • Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100
  • Familial hyperalphalipoproteinemia
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia - heterozygous
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia - homozygous
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia due to genetic defect of apolipoprotein B
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia due to heterozygous low density lipoprotein receptor mutation
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia due to homozygous low density lipoprotein receptor mutation
  • Familial hyperlipoproteinemia
  • Fredrickson type IIa hyperlipoproteinemia
  • Hyperalphalipoproteinemia
  • Hyperbetalipoproteinemia
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Hyperlipidemia, group A
  • Increased lipoprotein
  • Low density lipoprotein cholesterol above reference range
  • Periarthritis
  • Polygenic hypercholesterolemia
  • Primary hypercholesterolemia
  • Pure hypercholesterolemia
  • Secondary hypercholesterolemia
  • Serum cholesterol borderline high
  • Serum cholesterol raised
  • Serum cholesterol very high
  • Serum lipids high

Replaced Code Additional informationCallout TooltipReplaced Code
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2016. This codes was replaced for the FY 2017 (October 1, 2016-September 30, 2017).

This code was replaced in the 2017 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below.
  • E78.00 - Pure hypercholesterolemia, unspecified
  • E78.01 - Familial hypercholesterolemia

Information for Patients


Also called: HDL, Hypercholesterolemia, Hyperlipidemia, Hyperlipoproteinemia, LDL

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that occurs naturally in all parts of the body. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood and stick to the walls of your arteries. This is called plaque. Plaque can narrow your arteries or even block them.

High levels of cholesterol in the blood can increase your risk of heart disease. Your cholesterol levels tend to rise as you get older. There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high blood cholesterol, but it can be detected with a blood test. You are likely to have high cholesterol if members of your family have it, if you are overweight or if you eat a lot of fatty foods.

You can lower your cholesterol by exercising more and eating more fruits and vegetables. You also may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Cholesterol - drug treatment
  • Cholesterol and lifestyle
  • Cholesterol testing and results
  • Familial combined hyperlipidemia
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia
  • High blood cholesterol levels
  • How to take statins
  • Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Cholesterol (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality)
  • VLDL test

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Hypercholesterolemia Hypercholesterolemia is a condition characterized by very high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is produced in the body and obtained from foods that come from animals (particularly egg yolks, meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products). The body needs this substance to build cell membranes, make certain hormones, and produce compounds that aid in fat digestion. Too much cholesterol, however, increases a person's risk of developing heart disease.People with hypercholesterolemia have a high risk of developing a form of heart disease called coronary artery disease. This condition occurs when excess cholesterol in the bloodstream is deposited in the walls of blood vessels, particularly in the arteries that supply blood to the heart (coronary arteries). The abnormal buildup of cholesterol forms clumps (plaque) that narrow and harden artery walls. As the clumps get bigger, they can clog the arteries and restrict the flow of blood to the heart. The buildup of plaque in coronary arteries causes a form of chest pain called angina and greatly increases a person's risk of having a heart attack.Inherited forms of hypercholesterolemia can also cause health problems related to the buildup of excess cholesterol in other tissues. If cholesterol accumulates in tendons, it causes characteristic growths called tendon xanthomas. These growths most often affect the Achilles tendons and tendons in the hands and fingers. Yellowish cholesterol deposits under the skin of the eyelids are known as xanthelasmata. Cholesterol can also accumulate at the edges of the clear, front surface of the eye (the cornea), leading to a gray-colored ring called an arcus cornealis.
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