ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A39.9

Meningococcal infection, unspecified

Diagnosis Code A39.9

ICD-10: A39.9
Short Description: Meningococcal infection, unspecified
Long Description: Meningococcal infection, unspecified
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A39.9

Valid for Submission
The code A39.9 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other bacterial diseases (A30-A49)
      • Meningococcal infection (A39)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code A39.9 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 870 - SEPTICEMIA OR SEVERE SEPSIS WITH MV >96 HOURS
  • 871 - SEPTICEMIA OR SEVERE SEPSIS WITHOUT MV >96 HOURS WITH MCC
  • 872 - SEPTICEMIA OR SEVERE SEPSIS WITHOUT MV >96 HOURS WITHOUT MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 036.9 - Meningococcal infect NOS

Synonyms
  • Invasive meningococcal disease
  • Meningococcal infectious disease
  • Severe sepsis with acute organ dysfunction caused by Meningococcus

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code A39.9 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Meningococcal Infections

Meningococci are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. Meningococci can also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis.

Meningococcal infections can spread from person to person. Risk factors include

  • Age - it is more common in infants, teens, and young adults
  • Living in close quarters, such as in college dorms or military settings
  • Certain medical conditions, such as not having a spleen
  • Travel to areas where meningococcal disease is common

In its early stages, you may have flu-like symptoms and a stiff neck. But the disease can progress quickly and can be fatal. Early diagnosis and treatment are extremely important. Lab tests on your blood and cerebrospinal fluid can tell if you have it. Treatment is with antibiotics. Since the infection spreads from person to person, family members may also need to be treated.

A vaccine can prevent meningococcal infections.

  • Meningitis - meningococcal
  • Meningococcemia
  • Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome


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