ICD-10 Code A39.82

Meningococcal retrobulbar neuritis

Version 2019 Billable Code
ICD-10: A39.82
Short Description:Meningococcal retrobulbar neuritis
Long Description:Meningococcal retrobulbar neuritis

Valid for Submission

ICD-10 A39.82 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of meningococcal retrobulbar neuritis. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other bacterial diseases (A30-A49)
      • Meningococcal infection (A39)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert A39.82 to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 036.81 - Meningococc optic neurit (Approximate Flag)

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms:

  • Infection causing inflammation of optic nerve
  • Meningococcal optic neuritis
  • Meningococcal retrobulbar neuritis
  • Retrobulbar neuropathy

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A39.82 are found in the index:


Information for Patients


Eye Infections

Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are

  • Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. Children frequently get it, and it is very contagious.
  • Stye - a bump on the eyelid that happens when bacteria from your skin get into the hair follicle of an eyelash.

Symptoms of eye infections may include redness, itching, swelling, discharge, pain, or problems with vision. Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics.

  • Blepharitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Corneal ulcers and infections (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cytomegalovirus retinitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dacryoadenitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Endophthalmitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye burning - itching and discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Eye redness (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meibomianitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Orbital cellulitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Parinaud oculoglandular syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Periorbital cellulitis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Meningococcal Infections

Meningococci are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. Meningococci can also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis.

Meningococcal infections can spread from person to person. Risk factors include

  • Age - it is more common in infants, teens, and young adults
  • Living in close quarters, such as in college dorms or military settings
  • Certain medical conditions, such as not having a spleen
  • Travel to areas where meningococcal disease is common

In its early stages, you may have flu-like symptoms and a stiff neck. But the disease can progress quickly and can be fatal. Early diagnosis and treatment are extremely important. Lab tests on your blood and cerebrospinal fluid can tell if you have it. Treatment is with antibiotics. Since the infection spreads from person to person, family members may also need to be treated.

A vaccine can prevent meningococcal infections.

  • Meningococcemia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.