ICD-10-CM Code X30

Exposure to excessive natural heat

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

X30 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of exposure to excessive natural heat. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:X30
Short Description:Exposure to excessive natural heat
Long Description:Exposure to excessive natural heat

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code X30:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Exposure to excessive heat as the cause of sunstroke
  • Exposure to heat NOS

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • excessive heat of man-made origin W92
  • exposure to man-made radiation W89
  • exposure to sunlight X32
  • exposure to tanning bed W89

7th Character Note

7th Character Note
Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • The appropriate 7th character is to be added to code X30

7th Character

7th Character
Indicates that a seventh character is to be assigned to codes in a subcategory.
  • A - initial encounter
  • D - subsequent encounter
  • S - sequela

Index of External Cause of Injuries

References found for the code X30 in the External Cause of Injuries Index:

    • Effect(s) (adverse) of
      • insolation
    • Exposure(to)
      • excessive
        • heat (natural) NEC
    • Forces of nature
      • heat (natural)
    • Heat(effects of) (excessive)
    • Heat(effects of) (excessive)
      • due to
        • weather (conditions)
    • Hot
      • weather, effects
    • Ictus
      • solaris
    • Insolation, effects
    • Overexposure(accidental) (to)
      • heat

Code Classification

  • External causes of morbidity and mortality (V01–Y98)
    • Exposure to forces of nature (X30-X39)
      • Exposure to excessive natural heat (X30)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Heat Illness

Your body normally cools itself by sweating. During hot weather, especially when it is very humid, sweating just isn't enough to cool you off. Your body temperature can rise to dangerous levels and you can develop a heat illness.

Most heat illnesses happen when you stay out in the heat too long. Exercising and working outside in high heat can also lead to heat illness. Older adults, young children, and those who are sick or overweight are most at risk. Taking certain medicines or drinking alcohol can also raise your risk.

Heat-related illnesses include

  • Heat stroke - a life-threatening illness in which body temperature may rise above 106° F in minutes. Symptoms include dry skin, a rapid, strong pulse, dizziness, nausea, and confusion. If you see any of these signs, get medical help right away.
  • Heat exhaustion - an illness that can happen after several days of exposure to high temperatures and not enough fluids. Symptoms include heavy sweating, rapid breathing, and a fast, weak pulse. If it is not treated, it can turn into heat stroke.
  • Heat cramps - muscle pains or spasms that happen during heavy exercise. You usually get them in your abdomen, arms, or legs.
  • Heat rash - skin irritation from excessive sweating. It is more common in young children.

You can lower your risk of heat illness by drinking fluids to prevent dehydration, replacing lost salt and minerals, and limiting your time in the heat.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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