ICD-10 Code S21.90XS

Unspecified open wound of unspecified part of thorax, sequela

Version 2019 Billable Code POA Exempt

Valid for Submission

S21.90XS is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of unspecified open wound of unspecified part of thorax, sequela. The code is valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: S21.90XS
Short Description:Unsp open wound of unspecified part of thorax, sequela
Long Description:Unspecified open wound of unspecified part of thorax, sequela

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the thorax (S20-S29)
      • Open wound of thorax (S21)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert S21.90XS to ICD-9

The following crosswalk between ICD-10 to ICD-9 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • 906.0 - Lt eff opn wnd head/trnk (Approximate Flag)

Present on Admission (POA)

S21.90XS is exempt from POA reporting - The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
POA Indicator CodePOA Reason for CodeCMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
YDiagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission.YES
NDiagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission.NO
UDocumentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.NO
WClinically undetermined - unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission.YES
1Unreported/Not used - Exempt from POA reporting. NO

Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Acute lung injury
  • Burst fracture of thoracic vertebra
  • Complete spinal cord injury at T1-T6 level
  • Complete spinal cord injury at T7-T12 level
  • Compression fracture of thoracic spine
  • Compression fracture of thoracic vertebra
  • Contusion of lung
  • Contusion of lung with open wound into thorax
  • Contusion to heart
  • Contusion to heart with open wound into thorax
  • Direct acute lung injury
  • Dislocation of costovertebral joint
  • Fracture of eight OR more ribs
  • Fracture of five ribs
  • Fracture of four ribs
  • Fracture of one rib
  • Fracture of seven ribs
  • Fracture of six ribs
  • Fracture of spinous process of thoracic vertebra
  • Fracture of thoracic spine without spinal cord lesion
  • Fracture of three ribs
  • Fracture of transverse process of thoracic vertebra
  • Fracture of two ribs
  • Fractures involving thorax with lower back and pelvis with limb
  • Glass in chest
  • Glass in trunk
  • Heart injury, open
  • Heart laceration with open wound into thorax, with penetration of heart chambers
  • Hemopneumothorax
  • Injury of bronchus
  • Injury of bronchus
  • Injury of bronchus with open wound into thoracic cavity
  • Injury of cutaneous sensory nerve of upper limb
  • Injury of diaphragm
  • Injury of diaphragm
  • Injury of diaphragm with open wound into cavity
  • Injury of esophagus with open wound into thoracic cavity
  • Injury of heart with hemopericardium
  • Injury of heart with open wound into thorax
  • Injury of lung with open wound into thorax
  • Injury of pleura
  • Injury of pleura
  • Injury of subclavian artery
  • Injury of subclavian vein
  • Injury of thoracic duct
  • Injury of thoracic trachea
  • Injury of thymus gland
  • Intercostobrachial nerve injury
  • Laceration of heart
  • Laceration of heart with penetration of heart chambers
  • Laceration of lung
  • Long thoracic nerve injury
  • Long thoracic nerve lesion
  • Lung laceration with open wound into thorax
  • Multiple fractures of sternum
  • Multiple fractures of thoracic spine
  • Multiple fractures of upper limb with sternum
  • Multiple injuries of intrathoracic organs
  • Multiple injuries of thorax
  • Multiple intrathoracic organ injury with open wound into cavity
  • Multiple open wounds of thoracic wall
  • Open bilateral fracture of multiple ribs
  • Open division of ligament of thoracic vertebral column
  • Open division, chondrosternal ligament
  • Open division, costal cartilage ligament
  • Open division, rib ligament
  • Open division, rib ligament
  • Open division, sternal ligament
  • Open fracture involving thorax wth lower back and pelvis and limbs
  • Open fracture of eight OR more ribs
  • Open fracture of five ribs
  • Open fracture of four ribs
  • Open fracture of multiple left ribs
  • Open fracture of multiple ribs
  • Open fracture of multiple right ribs
  • Open fracture of one rib
  • Open fracture of one right rib
  • Open fracture of seven ribs
  • Open fracture of six ribs
  • Open fracture of T1-T6 level with anterior cord syndrome
  • Open fracture of T1-T6 level with central cord syndrome
  • Open fracture of T1-T6 level with incomplete spinal cord lesion
  • Open fracture of T1-T6 level with posterior cord syndrome
  • Open fracture of T1-T6 level with spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with incomplete spinal cord lesion
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with posterior cord syndrome
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of T7-T12 level with spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of thoracic spine with spinal cord lesion
  • Open fracture of thoracic vertebra without spinal cord injury
  • Open fracture of three ribs
  • Open fracture of two ribs
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra, burst
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra, posterior arch
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra, spinous process
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra, spondylolysis
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra, transverse process
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra, tricolumnar
  • Open fracture thoracic vertebra, wedge
  • Open heart injury with hemopericardium
  • Open injury of bronchus
  • Open injury of diaphragm
  • Open injury of lung
  • Open injury of pleura
  • Open injury of thoracic duct
  • Open injury of thoracic trachea
  • Open injury of thymus
  • Open injury, intercostobrachial nerve
  • Open injury, long thoracic nerve
  • Open injury, subclavian artery
  • Open injury, subclavian vein
  • Open multiple fracture of thoracic spine
  • Open multiple fractures of upper limb with sternum
  • Open spinal fracture with anterior thoracic cord lesion, T1-6
  • Open spinal fracture with anterior thoracic cord lesion, T7-12
  • Open spinal fracture with central thoracic cord lesion, T1-6
  • Open spinal fracture with complete thoracic cord lesion, T1-6
  • Open spinal fracture with complete thoracic cord lesion, T7-12
  • Open spinal fracture with posterior thoracic cord lesion, T1-6
  • Open spinal fracture with posterior thoracic cord lesion, T7-12
  • Open subluxation of thoracic and/or lumbar vertebra
  • Open traumatic dislocation costovertebral joint
  • Open traumatic dislocation of costochondral joint
  • Open traumatic subluxation costovertebral joint
  • Open traumatic subluxation of costochondral joint
  • Open wound of cervical esophagus without complication
  • Open wound of chest wall, uncomplicated
  • Open wound of neck without complication
  • Open wound of thorax
  • Open wounds involving thorax with abdomen, lower back and pelvis
  • Penetrating wound of lung
  • Subluxation of costochondral joint
  • Subluxation of costovertebral joint
  • Three column fracture of thoracic vertebra
  • Traumatic hemothorax
  • Traumatic hemothorax with open wound into thorax
  • Traumatic pneumohemothorax
  • Traumatic pneumohemothorax with open wound into thorax
  • Traumatic pneumothorax
  • Traumatic pneumothorax with open wound into thorax
  • Wedge fracture of thoracic vertebra
  • Wedge fracture of vertebra

Information for Patients


Chest Injuries and Disorders

The chest is the part of the body between your neck and your abdomen. It includes the ribs and breastbone. Inside your chest are several organs, including the heart, lungs, and esophagus. The pleura, a large thin sheet of tissue, lines the inside of the chest cavity.

Chest injuries and disorders include

  • Heart diseases
  • Lung diseases and collapsed lung
  • Pleural disorders
  • Esophagus disorders
  • Broken ribs
  • Thoracic aortic aneurysms
  • Disorders of the mediastinum, the space between the lungs, breastbone, and spine
  • Chest tube insertion (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Costochondritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mediastinal tumor (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pectus excavatum (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Rib fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Wounds and Injuries

Also called: Traumatic injuries

An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, falls, hits, weapons, and more. In the U.S., millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can happen at work or play, indoors or outdoors, driving a car, or walking across the street.

Wounds are injuries that break the skin or other body tissues. They include cuts, scrapes, scratches, and punctured skin. They often happen because of an accident, but surgery, sutures, and stitches also cause wounds. Minor wounds usually aren't serious, but it is important to clean them. Serious and infected wounds may require first aid followed by a visit to your doctor. You should also seek attention if the wound is deep, you cannot close it yourself, you cannot stop the bleeding or get the dirt out, or it does not heal.

Other common types of injuries include

  • Animal bites
  • Bruises
  • Burns
  • Dislocations
  • Electrical injuries
  • Fractures
  • Sprains and strains
  • Bleeding (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Crush injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cuts and puncture wounds (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Electrical injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gunshot wounds -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • How wounds heal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Laceration - sutures or staples - at home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lacerations - liquid bandage (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wet to dry dressing changes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wound care centers (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.