ICD-10-CM Code S09.1

Injury of muscle and tendon of head

Version 2020 Non-Billable Code

Not Valid for Submission

S09.1 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of muscle and tendon of head. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10:S09.1
Short Description:Injury of muscle and tendon of head
Long Description:Injury of muscle and tendon of head

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • S09.10 - Unspecified injury of muscle and tendon of head
  • S09.10XA - Unspecified injury of muscle and tendon of head, initial encounter
  • S09.10XD - Unspecified injury of muscle and tendon of head, subsequent encounter
  • S09.10XS - Unspecified injury of muscle and tendon of head, sequela
  • S09.11 - Strain of muscle and tendon of head
  • S09.11XA - Strain of muscle and tendon of head, initial encounter
  • S09.11XD - Strain of muscle and tendon of head, subsequent encounter
  • S09.11XS - Strain of muscle and tendon of head, sequela
  • S09.12 - Laceration of muscle and tendon of head
  • S09.12XA - Laceration of muscle and tendon of head, initial encounter
  • S09.12XD - Laceration of muscle and tendon of head, subsequent encounter
  • S09.12XS - Laceration of muscle and tendon of head, sequela
  • S09.19 - Other specified injury of muscle and tendon of head
  • S09.19XA - Other specified injury of muscle and tendon of head, initial encounter
  • S09.19XD - Other specified injury of muscle and tendon of head, subsequent encounter
  • S09.19XS - Other specified injury of muscle and tendon of head, sequela

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code S09.1:

Code Also

Code Also
A "code also" note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
  • any associated open wound S01

Type 2 Excludes

Type 2 Excludes
A type 2 excludes note represents "Not included here". An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • sprain to joints and ligament of head S03.9

Code Classification

  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the head (S00-S09)
      • Other and unspecified injuries of head (S09)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Head Injuries

Chances are you've bumped your head before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But other head injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury.

Head injuries can be open or closed. A closed injury does not break through the skull. With an open, or penetrating, injury, an object pierces the skull and enters the brain. Closed injuries are not always less severe than open injuries.

Some common causes of head injuries are falls, motor vehicle accidents, violence, and sports injuries.

It is important to know the warning signs of a moderate or severe head injury. Get help immediately if the injured person has

  • A headache that gets worse or does not go away
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • An inability to wake up
  • Dilated (enlarged) pupil in one or both eyes
  • Slurred speech
  • Weakness or numbness in the arms or legs
  • Loss of coordination
  • Increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation

Doctors use a neurologic exam and imaging tests to make a diagnosis. Treatment depends on the type of injury and how severe it is.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


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Muscle Disorders

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis.

Causes of muscle disorders include

  • Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis
  • A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy
  • Some cancers
  • Inflammation, such as myositis
  • Diseases of nerves that affect muscles
  • Infections
  • Certain medicines

Sometimes the cause is not known.


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