ICD-10-CM Code R29.891

Ocular torticollis

Version 2020 Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx

Valid for Submission

R29.891 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of ocular torticollis. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code R29.891 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like ocular torticollis.

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

ICD-10:R29.891
Short Description:Ocular torticollis
Long Description:Ocular torticollis

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code R29.891:

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • congenital sternomastoid torticollis Q68.0
  • psychogenic torticollis F45.8
  • spasmodic torticollis G24.3
  • torticollis due to birth injury P15.8
  • torticollis NOS M43.6

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R29.891 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Ocular torticollis

Clinical Information

  • OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS-. disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. these conditions may be divided into infranuclear nuclear and supranuclear disorders. diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves iii iv and vi are considered infranuclear. nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor trochlear or abducens nuclei in the brain stem. supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements including neural networks in the cerebral cortex; basal ganglia; cerebellum; and brain stem. ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. opsoclonus refers to rapid conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition e.g. opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome. adams et al. principles of neurology 6th ed p240

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code R29.891 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V37.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2019 through 09/30/2020.

  • 551 - MEDICAL BACK PROBLEMS WITH MCC
  • 552 - MEDICAL BACK PROBLEMS WITHOUT MCC

Convert R29.891 to ICD-9

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving the nervous and musculoskeletal systems (R25-R29)
      • Oth symptoms and signs involving the nervous and ms systems (R29)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Eye Diseases

Some eye problems are minor and don't last long. But some can lead to a permanent loss of vision.

Common eye problems include

  • Refractive errors
  • Cataracts - clouded lenses
  • Optic nerve disorders, including glaucoma
  • Retinal disorders - problems with the nerve layer at the back of the eye
  • Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision
  • Diabetic eye problems
  • Conjunctivitis - an infection also known as pinkeye

Your best defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and treatment could prevent vision loss. See an eye care professional right away if you have a sudden change in vision, if everything looks dim, or if you see flashes of light. Other symptoms that need quick attention are pain, double vision, fluid coming from the eye, and inflammation.

NIH: National Eye Institute


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Neck Injuries and Disorders

Any part of your neck - muscles, bones, joints, tendons, ligaments, or nerves - can cause neck problems. Neck pain is very common. Pain may also come from your shoulder, jaw, head, or upper arms.

Muscle strain or tension often causes neck pain. The problem is usually overuse, such as from sitting at a computer for too long. Sometimes you can strain your neck muscles from sleeping in an awkward position or overdoing it during exercise. Falls or accidents, including car accidents, are another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain.

Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.


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