ICD-10-CM Code R29.810

Facial weakness

Version 2020 Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx

Valid for Submission

R29.810 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of facial weakness. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code R29.810 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like bilateral facial muscle weakness, facial weakness, lower motor neurone, facial weakness, upper motor neurone, lower facial weakness, upper facial weakness, weak eye closure, etc

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

ICD-10:R29.810
Short Description:Facial weakness
Long Description:Facial weakness

Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized "head to toe" into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code R29.810:

Inclusion Terms

Inclusion Terms
These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of "other specified" codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • Facial droop

Type 1 Excludes

Type 1 Excludes
A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means "NOT CODED HERE!" An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Bell's palsy G51.0
  • facial weakness following cerebrovascular disease (I69. with final characters -92)

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code R29.810 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Bilateral facial muscle weakness
  • Facial weakness, lower motor neurone
  • Facial weakness, upper motor neurone
  • Lower facial weakness
  • Upper facial weakness
  • Weak eye closure
  • Weakness of face muscles
  • Weakness of left facial muscle
  • Weakness of right facial muscle

Convert R29.810 to ICD-9

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving the nervous and musculoskeletal systems (R25-R29)
      • Oth symptoms and signs involving the nervous and ms systems (R29)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Information for Patients


Facial Injuries and Disorders

Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, speech, breathing and your ability to swallow. Broken bones, especially the bones of your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries.

Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For example, nerve diseases like trigeminal neuralgia or Bell's palsy sometimes cause facial pain, spasms and trouble with eye or facial movement. Birth defects can also affect the face. They can cause underdeveloped or unusually prominent facial features or a lack of facial expression. Cleft lip and palate are a common facial birth defect.


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Neuromuscular Disorders

Neuromuscular disorders affect your neuromuscular system. They can cause problems with

  • The nerves that control your muscles
  • Your muscles
  • Communication between your nerves and muscles

These disorders can cause your muscles to become weak and waste away. You may also have symptoms such as spasms, twitching, and pain.

Examples of neuromuscular disorders include

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Spinal muscular atrophy

There can be different causes for these diseases. Many of them are genetic.This means they are inherited (run in families) or are caused by a new mutation in your genes. Some neuromuscular disorders are autoimmune diseases. Sometimes the cause is not known.

Many neuromuscular diseases have no cure. But treatments may improve symptoms, increase mobility, and lengthen life.


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