ICD-10 Code R03

Abnormal blood-pressure reading, without diagnosis

Version 2019 Non-Billable Code No Valid Principal Dx

Not Valid for Submission

R03 is a "header" nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of abnormal blood-pressure reading, without diagnosis. The code is NOT valid for the year 2019 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

ICD-10: R03
Short Description:Abnormal blood-pressure reading, without diagnosis
Long Description:Abnormal blood-pressure reading, without diagnosis

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • R03.0 - Elevated blood-pressure reading, without diagnosis of hypertension
  • R03.1 - Nonspecific low blood-pressure reading

Code Classification

  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems (R00-R09)
      • Abnormal blood-pressure reading, without diagnosis (R03)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (first year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA mandated code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019

Information for Patients


High Blood Pressure

Also called: Benign essential hypertension, Essential hypertension, HBP, HTN, Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure.

Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of

  • 119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure
  • 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure
  • Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.

You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • ACE inhibitors (Medical Encyclopedia)
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  • High blood pressure - children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • High blood pressure and eye disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • High blood pressure medications (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hypertensive heart disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
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  • Malignant hypertension (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renovascular hypertension (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Low Blood Pressure

Also called: Hypotension, LBP

You've probably heard that high blood pressure is a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems.

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps out blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is the diastolic pressure. Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually they're written one above or before the other, such as 120/80. If your blood pressure reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure.

Some people have low blood pressure all the time. They have no symptoms and their low readings are normal for them. In other people, blood pressure drops below normal because of a medical condition or certain medicines. Some people may have symptoms of low blood pressure when standing up too quickly. Low blood pressure is a problem only if it causes dizziness, fainting or in extreme cases, shock.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Low blood pressure (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

ICD-10 Footnotes

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag - The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag - The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag - The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.