ICD-10-CM Code N07.9

Hereditary nephropathy, not elsewhere classified with unspecified morphologic lesions

Version 2021 Billable Code

Valid for Submission

N07.9 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of hereditary nephropathy, not elsewhere classified with unspecified morphologic lesions. The code is valid for the fiscal year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code N07.9 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like 10p partial monosomy syndrome, autosomal dominant progressive nephropathy with hypertension, carpal-tarsal osteolysis with nephropathy, congenital nephritis, crome syndrome, deafness, small bowel diverticulosis, neuropathy syndrome, etc

ICD-10:N07.9
Short Description:Hereditary nephropathy, NEC w unsp morphologic lesions
Long Description:Hereditary nephropathy, not elsewhere classified with unspecified morphologic lesions

Index to Diseases and Injuries

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code N07.9 are found in the index:


Synonyms

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • 10p partial monosomy syndrome
  • Autosomal dominant progressive nephropathy with hypertension
  • Carpal-tarsal osteolysis with nephropathy
  • Congenital nephritis
  • Crome syndrome
  • Deafness, small bowel diverticulosis, neuropathy syndrome
  • Decreased hormone secretion
  • Deletion of part of chromosome 10
  • Dent disease type 1
  • Dent disease type 2
  • Dent's disease
  • Familial aplasia of the vermis
  • Hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps syndrome
  • Hereditary nephritis
  • Hereditary nephropathy
  • Hereditary sensory neuropathy
  • Hypoparathyroidism, deafness, renal disease syndrome
  • Idiopathic osteolyses
  • Inherited magnesium-losing nephropathy
  • Joubert syndrome
  • Joubert syndrome with renal defect
  • Magnesium-losing nephropathy
  • Marfanoid physique
  • Microcephalus, glomerulonephritis, marfanoid habitus syndrome
  • Nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis
  • Nephropathy, deafness, hyperparathyroidism syndrome
  • Non-progressive hereditary glomerulonephritis
  • Parathyroid hyperplasia
  • Peripheral sensory neuropathy
  • Primary hyperparathyroidism
  • Progressive hereditary glomerulonephritis without deafness
  • Sensory neuropathy
  • Spastic paraplegia, nephritis, deafness syndrome

Diagnostic Related Groups

The ICD-10 code N07.9 is grouped in the following groups for version MS-DRG V38.0 What are Diagnostic Related Groups?
The Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) are a patient classification scheme which provides a means of relating the type of patients a hospital treats. The DRGs divides all possible principal diagnoses into mutually exclusive principal diagnosis areas referred to as Major Diagnostic Categories (MDC).
applicable from 10/01/2020 through 09/30/2021.

  • 698 - OTHER KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 699 - OTHER KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 700 - OTHER KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert N07.9 to ICD-9

  • 583.9 - Nephritis NOS (Approximate Flag)

Code Classification

  • Diseases of the genitourinary system (N00–N99)
    • Glomerular diseases (N00-N08)
      • Hereditary nephropathy, not elsewhere classified (N07)

Code History

  • FY 2016 - New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
  • FY 2021 - No Change, effective from 10/1/2020 through 9/30/2021

Information for Patients


Genetic Disorders

Genes are the building blocks of heredity. They are passed from parent to child. They hold DNA, the instructions for making proteins. Proteins do most of the work in cells. They move molecules from one place to another, build structures, break down toxins, and do many other maintenance jobs.

Sometimes there is a mutation, a change in a gene or genes. The mutation changes the gene's instructions for making a protein, so the protein does not work properly or is missing entirely. This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder.

You can inherit a gene mutation from one or both parents. A mutation can also happen during your lifetime.

There are three types of genetic disorders:

  • Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects one gene. Sickle cell anemia is an example.
  • Chromosomal disorders, where chromosomes (or parts of chromosomes) are missing or changed. Chromosomes are the structures that hold our genes. Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder.
  • Complex disorders, where there are mutations in two or more genes. Often your lifestyle and environment also play a role. Colon cancer is an example.

Genetic tests on blood and other tissue can identify genetic disorders.

NIH: National Library of Medicine

  • Genetics (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]

Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • ACE inhibitors (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Acute nephritic syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Analgesic nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Atheroembolic renal disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bartter syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bilateral hydronephrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Congenital nephrotic syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Distal renal tubular acidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Glomerulonephritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Goodpasture syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • IgA nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Injury - kidney and ureter (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Interstitial nephritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney removal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney removal - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Membranoproliferative GN I (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Membranous nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Minimal change disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Nephrocalcinosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Nephrotic syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Obstructive uropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perirenal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Reflux nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renal papillary necrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renal vein thrombosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Unilateral hydronephrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)

[Learn More]