ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z89.029

Acquired absence of unspecified finger(s)

Diagnosis Code Z89.029

ICD-10: Z89.029
Short Description: Acquired absence of unspecified finger(s)
Long Description: Acquired absence of unspecified finger(s)
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z89.029


Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00–Z99)
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Acquired absence of limb (Z89)

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis Additional informationCallout TooltipUnacceptable principal diagnosis
There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Z89.029 is exempt from POA reporting.

Synonyms
  • Burn of two OR more fingers including thumb
  • Deep full thickness burn of a single finger with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn- of more than one finger with loss of body part
  • Deep full thickness burn of the thumb and finger
  • Deep third degree burn of finger, not thumb
  • Deep third degree burn of finger, not thumb with loss of body part
  • Deep third degree burn of hand with loss of body part
  • Deep third degree burn of hand with loss of body part
  • Deep third degree burn of two OR more fingers including thumb with loss of body part
  • Full thickness burn of a single finger
  • Full thickness burn of more than one finger
  • Full thickness burn of the thumb and finger
  • History of amputation of finger
  • History of partial amputation of hand
  • History of upper limb amputation
  • Third degree burn of single finger, not thumb
  • Third degree burn of single finger, not thumb
  • Third degree burn of single finger, not thumb
  • Third degree burn of thumb
  • Third degree burn of two OR more fingers including thumb

Information for Patients


Finger Injuries and Disorders

You use your fingers and thumbs to do everything from grasping objects to playing musical instruments to typing. When there is something wrong with them, it can make life difficult. Common problems include

  • Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations
  • Osteoarthritis - wear-and-tear arthritis. It can also cause deformity.
  • Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons
  • Dupuytren's contracture - a hereditary thickening of the tough tissue that lies just below the skin of your palm. It causes the fingers to stiffen and bend.
  • Trigger finger - an irritation of the sheath that surrounds the flexor tendons. It can cause the tendon to catch and release like a trigger.

  • Claw hand
  • Clubbing of the fingers or toes
  • Finger pain
  • Mallet finger - aftercare
  • Polydactyly
  • Smashed fingers
  • Trigger finger


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