ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q87.1

Congenital malform syndromes predom assoc w short stature

Diagnosis Code Q87.1

ICD-10: Q87.1
Short Description: Congenital malform syndromes predom assoc w short stature
Long Description: Congenital malformation syndromes predominantly associated with short stature
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q87.1

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Other congenital malformations (Q80-Q89)
      • Oth congenital malform syndromes affecting multiple systems (Q87)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q87.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q87.1 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Aarskog syndrome
  • Anomaly of chromosome pair 15
  • Bird-headed dwarfism with progressive ataxia, insulin-resistant diabetes, goiter, and primary gonadal insufficiency
  • Brittle hair
  • Brittle hair-impaired intellect-decreased fertility-short stature syndrome
  • Cockayne syndrome
  • Congenital malformation syndromes associated with short stature
  • Congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Cutaneous syndrome with ichthyosis
  • De Lange syndrome
  • Dubowitz's syndrome
  • Dwarfism, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, cutis laxa
  • Genetic defect of hair shaft
  • Mesomelic dysplasia
  • Mulibrey nanism syndrome
  • Multiple malformation syndrome with senile-like appearance
  • Multiple malformation syndrome, moderate short stature, facial
  • Multiple malformation syndrome, small stature, without skeletal dysplasia
  • Noonan's syndrome
  • Osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism
  • Osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type 1
  • Prader-Willi syndrome
  • Primordial dwarfism
  • Primordial dwarfism
  • Primordial dwarfism
  • Robinow syndrome
  • Rud's syndrome
  • Russell-Silver syndrome
  • Seckel syndrome
  • Short stature-characteristic facies-mental retardation-macrodontia-skeletal anomalies syndrome
  • Sjögren-Larsson syndrome
  • Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Warsaw breakage syndrome

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Q87.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. Some result from exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome. Infections during pregnancy can also result in birth defects. For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Some birth defects can be prevented. Taking folic acid can help prevent some birth defects. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take. Some medicines can cause serious birth defects.

Babies with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Intersex

[Read More]

Noonan syndrome Noonan syndrome is a condition that affects many areas of the body. It is characterized by mildly unusual facial features, short stature, heart defects, bleeding problems, skeletal malformations, and many other signs and symptoms.People with Noonan syndrome have distinctive facial features such as a deep groove in the area between the nose and mouth (philtrum), widely spaced eyes that are usually pale blue or blue-green in color, and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Affected individuals may have a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), poor teeth alignment, and a small lower jaw (micrognathia). Many children with Noonan syndrome have a short neck, and both children and adults may have excess neck skin (also called webbing) and a low hairline at the back of the neck.Between 50 and 70 percent of individuals with Noonan syndrome have short stature. At birth, they are usually a normal length and weight, but growth slows over time. Abnormal levels of growth hormone, a protein that is necessary for the normal growth of the body's bones and tissues, may contribute to the slow growth.Individuals with Noonan syndrome often have either a sunken chest (pectus excavatum) or a protruding chest (pectus carinatum). Some affected people may also have an abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis).Most people with Noonan syndrome have some form of critical congenital heart disease. The most common heart defect in these individuals is a narrowing of the valve that controls blood flow from the heart to the lungs (pulmonary valve stenosis). Some have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which enlarges and weakens the heart muscle.A variety of bleeding disorders have been associated with Noonan syndrome. Some affected individuals have excessive bruising, nosebleeds, or prolonged bleeding following injury or surgery. Rarely, women with Noonan syndrome who have a bleeding disorder have excessive bleeding during menstruation (menorrhagia) or childbirth.Adolescent males with Noonan syndrome typically experience delayed puberty. They go through puberty starting at age 13 or 14 and have a reduced pubertal growth spurt that results in shortened stature. Most males with Noonan syndrome have undescended testes (cryptorchidism), which may contribute to infertility (inability to father a child) later in life. Females with Noonan syndrome can experience delayed puberty but most have normal puberty and fertility.Noonan syndrome can cause a variety of other signs and symptoms. Most children diagnosed with Noonan syndrome have normal intelligence, but a few have special educational needs, and some have intellectual disability. Some affected individuals have vision or hearing problems. Affected infants may have feeding problems, which typically get better by age 1 or 2 years. Infants with Noonan syndrome may be born with puffy hands and feet caused by a buildup of fluid (lymphedema), which can go away on its own. Older individuals can also develop lymphedema, usually in the ankles and lower legs.Some people with Noonan syndrome develop cancer, particularly those involving the blood-forming cells (leukemia). It has been estimated that children with Noonan syndrome have an eightfold increased risk of developing leukemia or other cancers over age-matched peers.Noonan syndrome is one of a group of related conditions, collectively known as RASopathies. These conditions all have similar signs and symptoms and are caused by changes in the same cell signaling pathway. In addition to Noonan syndrome, the RASopathies include cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Costello syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, Legius syndrome, and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.
[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code Q87.0
Next Code
Q87.2 Next Code