ICD-10 Diagnosis Code P55.0

Rh isoimmunization of newborn

Diagnosis Code P55.0

ICD-10: P55.0
Short Description: Rh isoimmunization of newborn
Long Description: Rh isoimmunization of newborn
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code P55.0

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Hemorrhagic and hematological disorders of newborn (P50-P61)
      • Hemolytic disease of newborn (P55)

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 773.0 - NB hemolyt dis:rh isoimm

  • Hemolytic disease of fetus OR newborn due to RhD isoimmunization
  • Rhesus isoimmunization due to anti-c
  • Rhesus isoimmunization due to anti-Cw
  • Rhesus isoimmunization due to anti-D
  • Rhesus isoimmunization due to anti-E

Information for Patients

Rh Incompatibility

There are four major blood types: A, B, O, and AB. The types are based on substances on the surface of the blood cells. Another blood type is called Rh. Rh factor is a protein on red blood cells. Most people are Rh-positive; they have Rh factor. Rh-negative people don't have it. Rh factor is inherited though genes.

When you're pregnant, blood from your baby can cross into your bloodstream, especially during delivery. If you're Rh-negative and your baby is Rh-positive, your body will react to the baby's blood as a foreign substance. It will create antibodies (proteins) against the baby's blood. These antibodies usually don't cause problems during a first pregnancy.

But Rh incompatibility may cause problems in later pregnancies, if the baby is Rh-positive. This is because the antibodies stay in your body once they have formed. The antibodies can cross the placenta and attack the baby's red blood cells. The baby could get Rh disease, a serious condition that can cause a serious type of anemia.

Blood tests can tell whether you have Rh factor and whether your body has made antibodies. Injections of a medicine called Rh immune globulin can keep your body from making Rh antibodies. It helps prevent the problems of Rh incompatibility. If treatment is needed for the baby, it can include supplements to help the body to make red blood cells and blood transfusions.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution
  • Hemolytic disease of the newborn
  • Rh incompatibility

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants

[Read More]
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