ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E74.21


Diagnosis Code E74.21

ICD-10: E74.21
Short Description: Galactosemia
Long Description: Galactosemia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E74.21

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Other disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (E74)

Information for Medical Professionals

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Classical galactosemia, heterozygous type
  • Classical galactosemia, homozygous Duarte-type
  • Classical galactosemia, homozygous Negro-type
  • Deficiency of uridine diphosphate-glucose-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase
  • Deficiency of uridine triphosphate-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase
  • Deficiency of uridine triphosphate-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase
  • Deficiency of uridine triphosphate-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase
  • Disorder of galactose metabolism
  • Erythrocyte uridine diphosphate galactose-4-epimerase deficiency
  • Galactosemia
  • Generalized uridine diphosphate galactose-4-epimerase deficiency
  • Perinatal jaundice due to galactosemia
  • Uridine diphosphate glucose-4-epimerase deficiency

Information for Patients

Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process.

Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally your enzymes break carbohydrates down into glucose (a type of sugar). If you have one of these disorders, you may not have enough enzymes to break down the carbohydrates. Or the enzymes may not work properly. This causes a harmful amount of sugar to build up in your body. That can lead to health problems, some of which can be serious. Some of the disorders are fatal.

These disorders are inherited. Newborn babies get screened for many of them, using blood tests. If there is a family history of one of these disorders, parents can get genetic testing to see whether they carry the gene. Other genetic tests can tell whether the fetus has the disorder or carries the gene for the disorder.

Treatments may include special diets, supplements, and medicines. Some babies may also need additional treatments, if there are complications. For some disorders, there is no cure, but treatments may help with symptoms.

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Galactosemia Galactosemia is a disorder that affects how the body processes a simple sugar called galactose. A small amount of galactose is present in many foods. It is primarily part of a larger sugar called lactose, which is found in all dairy products and many baby formulas. The signs and symptoms of galactosemia result from an inability to use galactose to produce energy.Researchers have identified several types of galactosemia. These conditions are each caused by mutations in a particular gene and affect different enzymes involved in breaking down galactose.Classic galactosemia, also known as type I, is the most common and most severe form of the condition. If infants with classic galactosemia are not treated promptly with a low-galactose diet, life-threatening complications appear within a few days after birth. Affected infants typically develop feeding difficulties, a lack of energy (lethargy), a failure to gain weight and grow as expected (failure to thrive), yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), liver damage, and abnormal bleeding. Other serious complications of this condition can include overwhelming bacterial infections (sepsis) and shock. Affected children are also at increased risk of delayed development, clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract), speech difficulties, and intellectual disability. Females with classic galactosemia may develop reproductive problems caused by an early loss of function of the ovaries (premature ovarian insufficiency).Galactosemia type II (also called galactokinase deficiency) and type III (also called galactose epimerase deficiency) cause different patterns of signs and symptoms. Galactosemia type II causes fewer medical problems than the classic type. Affected infants develop cataracts but otherwise experience few long-term complications. The signs and symptoms of galactosemia type III vary from mild to severe and can include cataracts, delayed growth and development, intellectual disability, liver disease, and kidney problems.
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